The
1,000 IDEAS
Breaking News
e-Book

Breaking News English
ESL / EFL Lesson Plan on Strokes - by Sean Banville

000s
MORE
LESSONS

from Sean's other sites

February 22, 2010

PRINT:  13-Page Class Handout
LISTEN: MP3 (2:10 - 1,037KB)
PLAY:    Online Quiz


 
 
E-mail this lesson to
a student /colleague


Follow this site and my other sites on Facebook.


 

Singing Helps Stroke Victims Talk

Scientists in the USA have found that singing helps stroke victims with their speech difficulties. Doctors at two different medical schools said they had great success with getting patients to sing words instead of speak them. The treatment is called Music Intonation Therapy (MIT). One of the researchers, Gottfried Schlaug, gave an example of a success story. He showed a video of someone who had a stroke who could not speak the words of a birthday song. The person could only repeat the letters N and O. When Dr Schlaug asked him to sing the song, the words "happy birthday to you" came out. Schlaug said: "This patient has meaningless utterances when we ask him to say the words but as soon as we asked him to sing, he was able to speak the words."


The research team is still unclear why MIT works. Dr Schlaug has one theory. He points out that the brain processes music in a different part from that which deals with speech but that there are areas of overlap. "Music-making is a multisensory experience that simultaneously activates several systems in the brain and links and loops them together. It engages many regions of the brain," he said. MIT treatment is a very long process. It can last for up to 16 years and requires hourly sessions five days a week. The good news is the benefits of the therapy are usually permanent. Two thirds of patients who tried MIT with Dr Schlaug reported they could say more words. MIT could potentially help up to 70,000 stroke victims in the USA alone.


 
 

WARM-UPS

1. SINGING: Walk around the class and talk to other students about singing. Change partners often. Sit with your first partner(s) and share your findings.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words from the article are most interesting and which are most boring.

 

scientists / stroke victims / medical schools / success stories / birthday songs / words / unclear / theories / brain processes / the brain / therapy / good news / therapy

Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.

3. WORDS: What’s the best way to pronounce them? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners and share what you wrote. Change again and share again.

 

Your experiences of this

Good? Bad?

Singing them

 

 

Copying a recording

 

 

Looking at your lips

 

 

Recording yourself

 

 

Using symbols

 

 

Guessing

 

 

4. STROKES: Students A strongly believe scientists will be able to prevent all strokes in the future; Students B strongly believe the opposite.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations.

5. SINGING: Is it good for you? Rate these and share your ratings with your partner: 10 = absolutely, totally agree; 1 = no way! Change partners and share your ratings again.

  • singing helps English study
  • singing is a good therapy
  • singing makes you fit
  • singing is best done in groups
  • singing is best in the shower
  • we should all sing on trains
  • students need singing lessons every day
  • singing is a waste of time

6. BRAIN: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word ‘brain’. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.


 
 

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if  a-h  below are true (T) or false (F).

a.

Singing may be a new remedy for people who had a stroke.

T / F

b.

Two different medical schools tested a therapy called MIT.

T / F

c.

A woman on a video could not speak the words to a birthday song.

T / F

d.

A doctor said the patient sang a dozen songs fluently.

T / F

e.

The research team know exactly how and why MIT works.

T / F

f.

The brain processes music and speech in different places.

T / F

g.

MIT therapy usually lasts around 16 years.

T / F

h.

The MIT therapy could help 70,000 lonely American stroke victims.

T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

1.

difficulties

a.

worthless

2

great

b.

possibly

3.

success

c.

parts

4.

meaningless

d.

huge

5.

utterances

e.

problems

6.

links

f.

uses

7.

areas

g.

continue

8.

engages

h.

achievement

9.

last

i.

connects

10.

potentially

j.

words

3. PHRASE MATCH:  (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

1.

singing helps stroke victims with their

a.

a birthday song

2

they had great success with getting

b.

utterances

3.

an example of a

c.

still unclear

4.

speak the words of

d.

up to 16 years

5.

meaningless

e.

speech difficulties

6.

The research team is

f.

in a different part

7.

the brain processes music

g.

patients to sing

8.

Music-making is a multisensory

h.

in the USA alone

9.

It can last for

i.

success story

10.

help up to 70,000 stroke victims

j.

experience

 

WHILE READING / LISTENING

GAP FILL: Put the words into the gaps in the text.

Scientists in the USA have found that singing helps stroke victims with their ____________ difficulties. Doctors at two different medical schools said they had ____________ success with getting patients to sing words ____________ of speak them. The treatment is called Music Intonation Therapy (MIT). One of the researchers, Gottfried Schlaug, gave an example of a ____________ story. He showed a video of someone who had a stroke who could not speak the words of a birthday song. The person could only ____________ the letters N and O. When Dr Schlaug asked him to sing the song, the words "happy birthday to you" came out. Schlaug said: "This ____________ has meaningless ____________ when we ask him to say the words but as soon as we ____________ him to sing, he was able to speak the words."

 

 

 

patient
success
great
asked
instead
speech
utterances
repeat

The research team is still ____________ why MIT works. Dr Schlaug has one theory. He points out that the brain ____________ music in a different part from that which deals with speech but that there are areas of ____________. "Music-making is a multisensory experience that simultaneously activates ____________ systems in the brain and links and loops them together. It engages many regions of the brain," he said. MIT treatment is a very long ____________. It can ____________ for up to 16 years and requires hourly sessions five days a week. The good news is the ____________ of the therapy are usually permanent. Two thirds of patients who tried MIT with Dr Schlaug reported they could say more words. MIT could ____________ help up to 70,000 stroke victims in the USA alone.

 

 

benefits
process
processes
potentially
unclear
several
last
overlap

LISTENING – Listen and fill in the gaps

Scientists in the USA have found that singing _____________________ their speech difficulties. Doctors at two different medical schools said they _____________________ getting patients to sing words instead of speak them. The treatment is called Music Intonation Therapy (MIT). One of the researchers, Gottfried Schlaug, _____________________ success story. He showed a video of someone who had a stroke _____________________ the words of a birthday song. The person could only repeat the letters N and O. When Dr Schlaug _____________________ song, the words "happy birthday to you" came out. Schlaug said: "This patient has meaningless utterances when we ask him to say the words but as soon as we asked him to sing, _____________________ the words."

The research team _____________________ MIT works. Dr Schlaug has one theory. He points out that the brain processes music in a different part from _____________________ speech but that there are areas of overlap. "Music-making is a multisensory experience that simultaneously activates several systems in the brain _____________________ them together. It engages many regions of the brain," he said. MIT treatment is a very long process. It _____________________ 16 years and requires hourly sessions five days a week. The good news _____________________ therapy are usually permanent. Two thirds of patients who tried MIT with Dr Schlaug reported _____________________ words. MIT could potentially help up to 70,000 stroke victims in the USA alone.


 
 

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words ‘stroke’ and ‘victim’.

stroke

victim

 

 

 

  • Share your findings with your partners.
  • Make questions using the words you found.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

  • Share your questions with other classmates / groups.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

  • difficulties
  • great
  • treatment
  • repeat
  • happy
  • able
  • theory
  • deals
  • loops
  • hourly
  • usually
  • help

STUDENT SINGING SURVEY

Write five GOOD questions about singing in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper.

When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

 

STUDENT 1

_____________

STUDENT 2

_____________

STUDENT 3

_____________

Q.1.

 

 

 

 

Q.2.

 

 

 

 

Q.3.

 

 

 

 

Q.4.

 

 

 

 

Q.5.

 

 

 

 

  • Now return to your original partner and share and talk about what you found out. Change partners often.
  • Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings.

SINGING DISCUSSION

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

a)

What did you think when you read the headline?

b)

What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘stroke’?

c)

What happens to people when they have a stroke?

d)

Do you think singing is an effective therapy?

e)

What part did a birthday song have to play in this story?

f)

What do you think of the idea of Music Intonation Theory?

g)

Would you like to work as a researcher?

h)

What songs really change your feelings?

i)

What would life be like if you couldn’t speak?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

a)

Did you like reading this article?

b)

What do you know about the brain?

c)

Do you agree that music is a multi-sensory experience?

d)

Do you think singing changes things in your brain or makes you healthier?

e)

What questions would you like answered about strokes?

f)

What’s the difference between a stroke and a heart attack?

g)

What do you think of the 16-year treatment time?

h)

How does singing change you?

i)

What questions would you like to ask Dr Schlaug?

LANGUAGE – MULTIPLE CHOICE

Scientists in the USA have found that singing helps stroke victims with their speech (1) ___. Doctors at two different medical schools said they had great success with getting patients to sing words instead (2) ____ speak them. The treatment is called Music Intonation Therapy (MIT). One of the researchers, Gottfried Schlaug, gave an example of a (3) ____ story. He showed a video of someone who had a stroke who could not speak the words of a birthday song. The person could only (4) ____ the letters N and O. When Dr Schlaug asked him to sing the song, the words "happy birthday to you" came out. Schlaug said: "This patient has (5) ____ utterances when we ask him to say the words but as soon as we asked him to sing, he (6) ____ able to speak the words."

The research team is still unclear why MIT works. Dr Schlaug has (7) ____ theory. He points out that the brain processes music in a different part from that which (8) ____ with speech but that there are areas of overlap. "Music-making is a multisensory experience that simultaneously (9) ____ several systems in the brain and links and (10) ____ them together. It engages many regions of the brain," he said. MIT treatment is a very long process. It can last for up to 16 years and requires (11) ____ sessions five days a week. The good news is the benefits of the therapy are usually permanent. Two thirds of patients who tried MIT with Dr Schlaug reported they could say more words. MIT could potentially help (12) ____ to 70,000 stroke victims in the USA alone.

Put the correct words from the table below in the above article.

1.

(a)

difficult

(b)

difficulties

(c)

difference

(d)

different

2.

(a)

by

(b)

to

(c)

of

(d)

at

3.

(a)

success

(b)

successful

(c)

succeed

(d)

successfully

4.

(a)

repeats

(b)

repeated

(c)

repetitive

(d)

repeat

5.

(a)

meaning

(b)

meanings

(c)

meaningless

(d)

meant

6.

(a)

was

(b)

has

(c)

as

(d)

were

7.

(a)

once

(b)

only

(c)

on

(d)

one

8.

(a)

dealing

(b)

deals

(c)

dealt

(d)

dealers

9.

(a)

activities

(b)

actions

(c)

actively

(d)

activates

10.

(a)

hoops

(b)

whoops

(c)

loops

(d)

poops

11.

(a)

hours

(b)

hourly

(c)

hour

(d)

one hour

12.

(a)

up

(b)

across

(c)

down

(d)

over

WRITING

Write about singing for 10 minutes. Correct your partner’s paper.

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about strokes. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. SINGING: Make a poster about singing and its uses in therapy. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?

4. SPEECH: Write a magazine article about someone with speech difficulties. Include an imaginary interview with that person.

Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).

5. LETTER: Write a letter to Dr Gottfried Schlaug. Ask him three questions about singing therapy. Give him three ideas for other things he could use to help people with speech difficulties. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

ANSWERS

TRUE / FALSE:

a.

T

b.

T

c.

F

d.

F

e.

F

f.

T

g.

T

h.

F

SYNONYM MATCH:

1.

difficulties

a.

problems

2

great

b.

huge

3.

success

c.

achievement

4.

meaningless

d.

worthless

5.

utterances

e.

words

6.

links

f.

connects

7.

areas

g.

parts

8.

engages

h.

uses

9.

last

i.

continue

10.

potentially

j.

possibly

PHRASE MATCH:

1.

singing helps stroke victims with their

a.

speech difficulties

2

they had great success with getting

b.

patients to sing

3.

an example of a

c.

success story

4.

speak the words of

d.

a birthday song

5.

meaningless

e.

utterances

6.

The research team is

f.

still unclear

7.

the brain processes music

g.

in a different part

8.

Music-making is a multisensory

h.

experience

9.

It can last for

i.

up to 16 years

10.

help up to 70,000 stroke victims

j.

in the USA alone

GAP FILL:

Singing helps stroke victims talk

Scientists in the USA have found that singing helps stroke victims with their speech difficulties. Doctors at two different medical schools said they had great success with getting patients to sing words instead of speak them. The treatment is called Music Intonation Therapy (MIT). One of the researchers, Gottfried Schlaug, gave an example of a success story. He showed a video of someone who had a stroke who could not speak the words of a birthday song. The person could only repeat the letters N and O. When Dr Schlaug asked him to sing the song, the words "happy birthday to you" came out. Schlaug said: "This patient has meaningless utterances when we ask him to say the words but as soon as we asked him to sing, he was able to speak the words."

The research team is still unclear why MIT works. Dr Schlaug has one theory. He points out that the brain processes music in a different part from that which deals with speech but that there are areas of overlap. "Music-making is a multisensory experience that simultaneously activates several systems in the brain and links and loops them together. It engages many regions of the brain," he said. MIT treatment is a very long process. It can last for up to 16 years and requires hourly sessions five days a week. The good news is the benefits of the therapy are usually permanent. Two thirds of patients who tried MIT with Dr Schlaug reported they could say more words. MIT could potentially help up to 70,000 stroke victims in the USA alone.

LANGUAGE WORK

1 - b

2 - c

3 - a

4 - d

5 - c

6 - a

7 - d

8 - b

9 - d

10 - c

11 - b

12 - a

 

Help Support This Web Site

Sean Banville's Book

Thank You

Copyright © 2004-2010 by Sean Banville | Current Events | Links | About | Privacy Policy