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My 1,000
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Date: Jun 6, 2005

Level: Harder (Try the easier lesson.)

Downloads: Word Doc | PDF Doc | Listening

Audio: (2:00 - 236.2 KB - 16kbps)

THE ARTICLE

British Finance Minister Gordon Brown has urged the wealthy, oil-producing nations of the Arabian Gulf to do their part in lifting Africa out of poverty by contributing $20 billion in aid. He reminded the oil barons that they have benefited considerably from recent oil price hikes and should redistribute a little of their oil coffers. He said: “I would like to see the oil producing states, the countries that have done well out of the rise in oil prices, being willing to make a contribution…to the new development agenda.” This is a dress rehearsal for Mr. Brown’s bid to drum up support for his plan to help Africa at next month’s G8 summit. He said although this was a “crucial week”, the details could be “thrashed out over the next few days.”

Mr. Brown is trying to find an additional $20 billion to add to the $80 billion already assured from the European Union for his aid kitty for Africa. He needs a back-up plan should a so-far reluctant George W. Bush balk at contributing when he meets with Tony Blair for crunch talks in Washington this week. Mr. Brown said: “Globally, tackling the world’s deadliest diseases and halving world poverty will require the overall doubling of aid to Africa.” He hopes to open up markets to African producers, reduce debt relief and inject much needed investment into Africa. Mr. Brown laid down the gauntlet for Mr. Bush to do his part, saying: “This is not a time for timidity, nor a time to fear reaching new heights.”

WARM-UPS

1. LAYING DOWN THE GAUNTLET: In pairs / groups pretend to be world leaders. Student(s) A must lay down the gauntlet to Student(s) B (Student B is George W. Bush, who does not want to agree to anything student A suggests). The challenges A puts to B may include:

  1. Completely withdraw from Iraq next month.
  2. Release all detainees from Guantanamo Bay.
  3. Sign up to the Kyoto Protocol on climate change to create a cleaner world.
  4. Give Tony Blair $20 billion for African Aid and end poverty in Africa.
  5. Dismantle all of your nuclear weapons to secure a more peaceful world.
  6. Stop taking so many holidays in Texas, or, resign.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words are most interesting and which are most boring.

Rich countries / poor countries / oil-producing countries / oil / oil prices / Africa / $100 billion / dress rehearsals / world poverty / laying down the gauntlet

Have a chat about the topics you liked. For more conversation, change topics and partners frequently.

3. ARABIAN GULF: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the Arabian Gulf. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.

4. STORY PREDICTION: In pairs / groups, use the words from the “CHAT” activity to predict how the story in the article will unfold. Change partners and compare your stories. If you have different interpretations or ideas, talk about which is likelier to be in the actual article.

5. 2-MINUTE DEBATES: With a partner, engage in these fun 2-minute debates. Students A firmly believe in the opinions on the left, Students B support the opinions on the right. Change partners often.

  1. Great change will come to Africa. vs. Western countries can never bring great change.
  2. George W. Bush will give the $20 billion. vs. He needs it for the conflict in Iraq.
  3. The British plan is great. vs. It’s just another plan for Africa that won’t work.
  4. Africa must first help itself. vs. There is too much corruption.
  5. The whole world must help Africa. vs. Charity begins at home.
  6. Oil nations should do more. vs. They must protect their futures after the oil runs out.
  7. Gordon Brown should get the Nobel Peace Prize. vs. He’s only had a few meetings.
  8. One percent of oil revenues should go to help Africa. vs. Oil companies are not charities.

 
 

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Look at the article’s headline and guess whether these sentences are true (T) or false (F):

a.

Countries around the Mexican Gulf are being asked to help Africa.

T / F

b.

Britain’s finance minister wants $200 billion from oil-rich nations.

T / F

c.

Money in oil coffers has greatly increased following oil price hikes.

T / F

d.

Britain’s finance minister will play the drums at the G8 summit.

T / F

e.

Britain’s finance minister has a kitty.

T / F

f.

George W. Bush and Tony Blair will talk about crunching.

T / F

g.

Britain’s finance minister wants to inject funds into Africa.

T / F

h.

The minister challenged George W. Bush to be bold and fearless.

T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article:

a.

urged

funds

b.

barons

faint-heartedness

c.

coffers

negotiated

d.

crucial

industrialists

e.

thrashed out

uneager

f.

kitty

shirk

g.

reluctant

pressed

h.

balk

challenged

i.

laid down the gauntlet

purse

j.

timidity

vital

3. PHRASE MATCH: Match the following phrases from the article (sometimes more than one combination is possible):

a.

do their

up support

b.

lifting Africa

investment into Africa

c.

price

kitty

d.

Mr. Brown’s bid to drum

out of poverty

e.

the details could be thrashed

heights

f.

aid

part

g.

crunch

out

h.

inject much needed

hikes

i.

laid down

talks

j.

reaching new

the gauntlet

WHILE READING / LISTENING

WORD ORDER: Put the underlined words into the correct order.

Oil-rich Gulf urged to help Africa

British Finance Minister Gordon Brown has urged the wealthy, oil-producing nations of the Arabian Gulf part their do in to lifting Africa out of poverty by contributing $20 billion in aid. He reminded the oil barons that they have benefited considerably from oil hikes price recent and should redistribute a coffers of their little oil. He said: “I would like to see the oil producing states, the countries that have done well out of the rise in oil prices, being willing to make a contribution…to the new development agenda.” This is a dress for Mr. Brown’s bid rehearsal to drum up support for his plan to help Africa at next month’s G8 summit. He said although this was a “crucial week”, the thrashed could be out details over the next few days.”

Mr. Brown is additional to trying an find $20 billion to add to the $80 billion already assured from the European Union for his aid kitty for Africa. He needs a back-up so-far should a plan reluctant George W. Bush balk at contributing when he meets with Tony Blair this crunch Washington talks for in week. Mr. Brown said: “Globally, tackling the world’s deadliest diseases and halving world poverty will doubling overall of the require aid to Africa.” He hopes to open up markets to African producers, reduce debt relief and inject much needed investment into Africa. Mr. Brown laid down the gauntlet for Mr. Bush to do his part, saying: “This is not a time for timidity, nor a fear time to new heights reaching.”

 
 

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionaries / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words ‘Arabian’ and ‘Gulf’.

  • Share your findings with your partners.
  • Make questions using the words you found.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

  • Share your questions with other classmates / groups.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

3. WORD ORDER: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers.

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. STUDENT POVERTY IN AFRICA SURVEY: In pairs / groups write down questions about poverty in Africa and what can be done to reduce it.

  • Ask other classmates your questions and note down their answers.
  • Go back to your original partner / group and compare your findings.
  • Make a mini-presentation to another group / the class on your findings.

6. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall exactly how these were used in the text:

  • urged
  • poverty
  • coffers
  • dress
  • drum
  • details
  • kitty
  • crunch
  • doubling
  • inject
  • gauntlet
  • timidity

 DISCUSSION

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

  1. What was your reaction to reading the headline?
  2. Have you been following the news of Gordon Brown and G8?
  3. Do you think this is yet another plan for Africa that won’t work?
  4. Do you think the oil-rich Gulf nations should give the $20 billion?
  5. Do you think the combination of Gordon Brown’s plan, G8 and Live 8 mean something special is happening regarding aid for Africa?
  6. Why do you think Africa is a forgotten continent?
  7. Do you think Africa will emerge into a continent of tiger economies, just like Asia did?
  8. What do you think of a 10% rise in gasoline / petrol prices to help raise money for Africa?
  9. How long do you think it will take for Africa to become wealthy?
  10. Do you think disease will ever be eradicated from Africa?

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

  1. Did you like reading the article?
  2. How did this news make you feel?
  3. What do you think of Gordon Brown’s plan?
  4. Do you think Tony Blair can persuade George W. Bush to part with $20 billion?
  5. Would it be easy for you to part with a lot of money?
  6. Do you think Gordon Brown’s plan will have a big impact on Africa?
  7. What would it take to bring Africa out of poverty?
  8. What are the most pressing issues for Africa?
  9. Should Bob Geldof, Gordon Brown and Tony Blair get a Nobel Prize?
  10. Did you like this discussion?

AFTER DISCUSSION: Join another partner / group and tell them what you talked about.

  1. What question would you like to ask about this topic?
  2. What was the most interesting thing you heard?
  3. Was there a question you didn’t like?
  4. Was there something you totally disagreed with?
  5. What did you like talking about?
  6. Do you want to know how anyone else answered the questions?
  7. Which was the most difficult question?

SPEAKING

HELP GORDON: Help British Finance Minister Gordon Brown help Africa. In pairs / groups, work out a plan to raise money in your school / community for African charities. Use this table to help you:


NAME OF YOUR PLAN ________________________________________
 

TO THINK ABOUT

  THE DETAILS

Aims
(What do you want to do?)

 

Methods
(How are you going to achieve your aims?)

 

People
(Who’s going to do what?)

 

Contingencies
(What might go wrong and what is your “Plan B”?)

 

Timeline
(When is everything going to start and finish?)

 

Other?

 

 

  • After you have finished, change partners / groups and look at other students plans (the more the better).
  • Give advice / feedback to improve your each other’s plans.
  • In pairs / groups, discuss the merits of all the plans you saw and vote for the best one(s).
  • Go and set your plans into action!

LISTENING

Listen and fill in the spaces.

Oil-rich Gulf urged to help Africa

British Finance Minister Gordon Brown ___ _____ ___ _______, oil-producing nations of the Arabian Gulf __ __ ____ ____ __ lifting Africa out of poverty by contributing $20 billion in aid. He reminded the oil barons that they have benefited considerably from _____ ___ ____ ____ and should redistribute a little __ _____ ___ _______. He said: “I would like to see the oil producing states, the countries that have done well out of the rise in oil prices, being willing to make a contribution…to the new development agenda.” This is __ _____ _______ ___ Mr. Brown’s bid to drum up support for his plan to help Africa at next month’s G8 summit. He said although this was a “crucial week”, the details could be “________ ___ ____ the next few days.”

Mr. Brown is trying to find an additional $20 billion __ ___ __ ___ $80 billion already assured from the European Union ___ ___ ___ _____ ___ Africa. He needs a back-up plan ______ __ __-___ _________ George W. Bush balk at contributing when he meets with Tony Blair for crunch talks in Washington this week. Mr. Brown said: “Globally, tackling the world’s deadliest diseases and halving world poverty will require ___ _______ _________ __ ____ to Africa.” He hopes to open up markets to African producers, reduce debt relief and inject much needed investment into Africa. Mr. Brown ____ _____ ___ ________ for Mr. Bush to do his part, saying: “This is ___ __ ____ ____ ________, nor a time to fear reaching new heights.”

HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find more information on Gordon Brown’s quest to raise funds for Africa. Share your findings with your class in the next lesson.

3. ARABIAN GULF: Make a poster on the countries and emirates of the Arabian Gulf. You could focus on culture, people, economy, oil, tourism, sport or themes of your own choosing. Show your posters to your classmates in your next lesson.

4. LETTER: Write a letter to British Finance Minister Gordon Brown telling him what you think of his plan. Give him advice on how to use the aid money. Show your letter to your classmates in your next lesson. Did you all write about similar things?

ANSWERS

TRUE / FALSE:

a. F

b. F

c. T

d. F

e. T

f. F

g. T

h. T

SYNONYM MATCH:

a.

urged

pressed

b.

barons

industrialists

c.

coffers

funds

d.

crucial

vital

e.

thrashed out

negotiated

f.

kitty

purse

g.

reluctant

uneager

h.

balk

shirk

i.

laid down the gauntlet

challenged

j.

timidity

faint-heartedness

PHRASE MATCH:

a.

do their

part

b.

lifting Africa

out of poverty

c.

price

hikes

d.

Mr. Brown’s bid to drum

up support

e.

the details could be thrashed

out

f.

aid

kitty

g.

crunch

talks

h.

inject much needed

investment into Africa

i.

laid down

the gauntlet

j.

reaching new

heights

WORD ORDER:

Oil-rich Gulf urged to help Africa

British Finance Minister Gordon Brown has urged the wealthy, oil-producing nations of the Arabian Gulf to do their part in lifting Africa out of poverty by contributing $20 billion in aid. He reminded the oil barons that they have benefited considerably from recent oil price hikes and should redistribute a little of their oil coffers. He said: “I would like to see the oil producing states, the countries that have done well out of the rise in oil prices, being willing to make a contribution…to the new development agenda.” This is a dress rehearsal for Mr. Brown’s bid to drum up support for his plan to help Africa at next month’s G8 summit. He said although this was a “crucial week”, the details could be “thrashed out over the next few days.”

Mr. Brown is trying to find an additional $20 billion to add to the $80 billion already assured from the European Union for his aid kitty for Africa. He needs a back-up plan should a so-far reluctant George W. Bush balk at contributing when he meets with Tony Blair for crunch talks in Washington this week. Mr. Brown said: “Globally, tackling the world’s deadliest diseases and halving world poverty will require the overall doubling of aid to Africa.” He hopes to open up markets to African producers, reduce debt relief and inject much needed investment into Africa. Mr. Brown laid down the gauntlet for Mr. Bush to do his part, saying: “This is not a time for timidity, nor a time to fear reaching new heights.”

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