The Reading / Listening - Iceberg A68a - Level 6

An enormous iceberg that is heading toward the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into three large chunks. Scientists from NASA have been tracking the berg - dubbed A68a - for several weeks. It actually calved from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since. In recent weeks, a fast-moving stream of water known as the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front has put the chunks on a trajectory that means they could run aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say the three fragments are roughly 2,600 square kilometres in size. The submerged part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.



The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks poses a serious threat to the wildlife of South Georgia. There could be an environmental catastrophe waiting to happen. If the three mini icebergs collide with the seabed, they could obstruct penguins and seals from foraging for fish. They could also block the route between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during the breeding season. Scientists worry the underside of the fragments could grind the seabed near South Georgia and disrupt delicate underwater ecosystems. This could be exacerbated by the introduction of a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the stationary fragments melt over the summer months.

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

    Iceberg A68a - Level 4  or  Iceberg A68a - Level 5

Sources
  • https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-55428520
  • https://newatlas.com/science/giant-iceberg-a-68a-south-georgia-splits-three/
  • https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/giant-iceberg-heading-toward-south-atlantic-island-breaks-n1252204


Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)



Warm-ups

1. ICEBERGS: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about icebergs. Change partners often and share your findings.
2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?
       enormous / iceberg / chunks / scientists / tracking / stream / trajectory / fragment /
       bulk / threat / wildlife / environmental / catastrophe / penguins / seals / fish / melt
Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.
3. GLOBAL WARMING: Students A strongly believe global warming is irreversible; Students B strongly believe it isn't. Change partners again and talk about your conversations.
4. ICE: What do you know and what do you want to know about these things? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.

 

What I Know

What I Want To Know

Iceberg

 

 

Ice shelf

 

 

Hail

 

 

Snow

 

 

Glacier

 

 

Ice

 

 

MY e-BOOK
ESL resource book with copiable worksheets and handouts - 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers / English teachers
See a sample

5. ISLAND: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "island". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.
6. WILDLIFE: Rank these with your partner. Put the best at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • Penguins
  • Seals
  • Albatross
  • Tardigrades
  • Polar bears
  • Mites
  • Nematode worms
  • Krill

 

Vocabulary

    Paragraph 1

      1. enormous a. The path followed by an object moving under the action of given forces.
      2. tracking b. Gave an unofficial name or nickname to someone or something.
      3. dubbed c. Following the course or trail of someone or something, usually to find them or note their location at various points.
      4. calved d. Under water.
      5. trajectory e. Very large in size, quantity, or extent.
      6. fragment f. Of a mass of ice split off from an iceberg or glacier.
      7. submerged g. A small part broken or separated off something.

    Paragraph 2

      8. bulk h. Present or constitute a problem, danger, or difficulty.
      9. pose i. Of a person or animal searching widely for food or provisions.
      10. catastrophe j. Not moving or not intended to be moved.
      11. collide k. An event causing great and often sudden damage or suffering; a disaster.
      12. foraging l. Made a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling worse.
      13. exacerbated m. Hit with force when moving.
      14. stationary n. The mass or magnitude of something large.

 

Before reading / listening

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if 1-8 below are true (T) or false (F).

  1. The article says the biggest iceberg ever is floating in the Atlantic Ocean. T / F
  2. Scientists from NASA are following the course of the iceberg.     T / F
  3. The iceberg broke away from an ice shelf in 2017.     T / F
  4. The iceberg is 2,600 metres deep.     T / F
  5. The iceberg poses no threat to wildlife.     T / F
  6. The article says an environmental catastrophe is waiting to happen.    T / F
  7. The iceberg will help penguins get to their breeding grounds.     T / F
  8. Melting water from the iceberg could damage ecosystems.     T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

  1. enormous
  2. broken up
  3. floating
  4. trajectory
  5. submerged
  6. bulk
  7. catastrophe
  8. foraging
  9. exacerbated
  10. stationary
  1. course
  2. underwater
  3. static
  4. disintegrated
  5. searching
  6. gigantic
  7. size
  8. made worse
  9. drifting
  10. calamity

3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

  1. An enormous iceberg that is heading
  2. broken up into
  3. It actually calved from
  4. a fast-moving
  5. run aground
  6. poses a
  7. an environmental
  8. obstruct penguins and seals from
  9. during the breeding
  10. exacerbated by the introduction of a mass
  1. catastrophe
  2. stream of water
  3. foraging for fish
  4. three large chunks
  5. serious threat
  6. of fresh water
  7. toward the island
  8. season
  9. off the coast
  10. the Larsen C ice shelf

Gap fill

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
roughly
tracking
stream
submerged
heading
calved
chunks
trajectory

An enormous iceberg that is (1) _____________________ toward the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into three large (2) _____________________. Scientists from NASA have been (3) _____________________ the berg - dubbed A68a - for several weeks. It actually (4) _____________________ from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since. In recent weeks, a fast-moving (5) _____________________ of water known as the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front has put the chunks on a (6) _____________________ that means they could run aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say the three fragments are (7) _____________________ 2,600 square kilometres in size. The (8) _____________________ part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
delicate
colonies
stationary
poses
underside
catastrophe
exacerbated
obstruct

The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks (9) _____________________ a serious threat to the wildlife of South Georgia. There could be an environmental (10) _____________________ waiting to happen. If the three mini icebergs collide with the seabed, they could (11) _____________________ penguins and seals from foraging for fish. They could also block the route between penguin (12) _____________________ and their feeding grounds during the breeding season. Scientists worry the (13) _____________________ of the fragments could grind the seabed near South Georgia and disrupt (14) _____________________ underwater ecosystems. This could be (15) _____________________ by the introduction of a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the (16) _____________________ fragments melt over the summer months.

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1) A68a - for several weeks. It actually calved from the Larsen C ______
     a.  icy shelf
     b.  iced shelf
     c.  ice shelf
     d.  ices shelf
2)  In recent weeks, a fast-moving ______
     a.  streams of water
     b.  stream of water
     c.  streamed of water
     d.  streamer of water
3)  Current Front has put the chunks on a trajectory that means they ______
     a.  could run a ground
     b.  could runner ground
     c.  could run aground
     d.  could run a grind
4)  Scientists say the three fragments are roughly 2,600 square ______
     a.  kilometres in size
     b.  kilometres on size
     c.  kilometres of size
     d.  kilometres at size
5)  The submerged part of one chunk is 106 metres at ______
     a.  its thickest point
     b.  its thickest pint
     c.  its thickest punt
     d.  its thickest pent

6)  The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks poses ______
     a.  a serious treat
     b.  a serious threat
     c.  a seriously threat
     d.  a series threat
7)  There could be an environmental catastrophe ______
     a.  waiting to happen
     b.  waiting true happen
     c.  waiting thru happen
     d.  waiting through happen
8)  they could obstruct penguins and seals from ______
     a.  for aging for fish
     b.  forage in for fish
     c.  forage gin for fish
     d.  foraging for fish
9)  between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during ______
     a.  the breed in season
     b.  the breeding season
     c.  the bleeding season
     d.  the beading season
10) a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the stationary ______
     a.  fragments melts
     b.  fragments melty
     c.  fragments melt
     d.  fragments melted

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

An enormous iceberg that (1) ____________________ the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into three large chunks. Scientists from NASA have been (2) ____________________ - dubbed A68a - for several weeks. It (3) ____________________ the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since. In recent weeks, a fast-moving stream of water known as the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front has put the chunks (4) ____________________ that means they could run aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say (5) ____________________ are roughly 2,600 square kilometres in size. The (6) ____________________ one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.

The (7) ____________________ the three iceberg chunks poses a serious threat to (8) ____________________ South Georgia. There could be an environmental catastrophe waiting to happen. If the three mini (9) ____________________ the seabed, they could obstruct penguins and seals from foraging for fish. They could also (10) ____________________ between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during the breeding season. Scientists worry the underside of the fragments could (11) ____________________ near South Georgia and disrupt delicate underwater ecosystems. This could be exacerbated by the introduction of a (12) ____________________ water to the ecosystems as the stationary fragments melt over the summer months.

Comprehension questions

  1. How big does the article say the iceberg is?
  2. Which organisation is tracking the course of the iceberg?
  3. Where did the iceberg break off (calve) from?
  4. What is the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front?
  5. How thick is the thickest point of the submerged part of the iceberg?
  6. What does the article say the iceberg poses a serious threat to?
  7. What does the article say could be waiting to happen?
  8. What might penguin colonies not be able to reach?
  9. What could the underside of the iceberg do to the seabed?
  10. What might further exacerbate damage to underwater ecosystems?




Multiple choice quiz

1) How big does the article say the iceberg is?
a) the biggest ever
b) super-sized
c) pretty huge
d) enormous
2) Which organisation is tracking the course of the iceberg?
a) the UN
b) NASA
c) Tesla
d) Space X
3) Where did the iceberg break off (calve) from?
a) the North Pole
b) a cliff
c) the Larsen C ice shelf
d) a glacier
4) What is the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front?
a) a fast-moving stream of water
b) a revolutionary movement of penguins
c) a mass of war air
d) a huge ice cliff
5) How thick is the thickest point of the submerged part of the iceberg?
a) 104 metres
b) 105 metres
c) 106 metres
d) 107 metres

6) What does the article say the iceberg poses a serious threat to?
a) Earth
b) wildlife
c) climate change
d) ocean currents
7) What does the article say could be waiting to happen?
a) breeding of penguins
b) climate change
c) summer
d) an environmental catastrophe
8) What might penguin colonies not be able to reach?
a) their breeding grounds
b) the age of 50
c) dry land
d) their goals
9) What could the underside of the iceberg do to the seabed?
a) freeze it
b) polish it
c) grind it
d) enhance it
10) What might further exacerbate damage to underwater ecosystems?
a) climate change
b) melting fresh water
c) fish
d) fights among penguins

Role play

Role  A – Penguins
You think penguins are the most interesting Antarctic creatures. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their creatures aren't as interesting. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): tardigrades, blue whales or krill.

Role  B – Tardigrades
You think tardigrades are the most interesting Antarctic creatures. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their creatures aren't as interesting. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): penguins, blue whales or krill.

Role  C – Blue Whales
You think blue whales are the most interesting Antarctic creatures. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their creatures aren't as interesting. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): tardigrades, penguins or krill.

Role  D – Krill
You think krill are the most interesting Antarctic creatures. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their creatures aren't as interesting. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): tardigrades, blue whales or penguins.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'giant'

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • and 'iceberg'.

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • • Share your findings with your partners.

    • Make questions using the words you found.

    • Ask your partner / group your questions.

    2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

    •Share your questions with other classmates / groups. •Ask your partner / group your questions.

    3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

    4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

    5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

    • heading
    • large
    • shelf
    • ever
    • run
    • point
    • bulk
    • happen
    • foraging
    • feeding
    • delicate
    • melt




    Student survey

    Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

    (Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

    Discussion - Iceberg A68a

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    1. What did you think when you read the headline?
    2. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'giant'?
    3. What do you know about icebergs?
    4. How important are icebergs?
    5. What do you know about Antarctica?
    6. Would you like to visit Antarctica?
    7. How much damage could an enormous floating iceberg do?
    8. How much of a threat is global warming to Antarctica?
    9. What does "just the tip of the iceberg" mean?
    10. What wildlife is dependent on icebergs?

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    1. Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
    2. What do you think of when you hear the word 'iceberg'?
    3. What do you think about what you read?
    4. What do you know about the wildlife in Antarctica?
    5. How big an environmental catastrophe could the Iceberg A68a cause?
    6. What are the ecosystems like?
    7. Why might fresh water harm the ecosystem?
    8. What would you like to know about icebergs?
    9. What three adjectives best describe this story?
    10. What questions would you like to ask the scientists?

    Discussion — Write your own questions

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    (a) ________________

    (b) ________________

    (c) ________________

    (d) ________________

    (e) ________________

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    (f) ________________

    (g) ________________

    (h) ________________

    (i) ________________

    (j) ________________





    Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

    An enormous iceberg that is (1) ____ toward the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into three large chunks. Scientists from NASA have been (2) ____ the berg - dubbed A68a by scientists - for several weeks. It actually (3) ____ from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since. In recent weeks, a fast-moving stream of water known as the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current (4) ____ has put the chunks on a trajectory that means they could (5) ____ aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say the three fragments are roughly 2,600 square kilometres in size. The (6) ____ part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.

    The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks (7) ____ a serious threat to the wildlife of South Georgia. There could be an environmental (8) ____ waiting to happen. If the three mini icebergs collide with the seabed, they could obstruct penguins and seals from (9) ____ for fish. They could also block the route between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during the breeding season. Scientists worry the underside of the fragments could (10) ____ the seabed near South Georgia and disrupt delicate underwater ecosystems. This could be exacerbated (11) ____ the introduction of a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the (12) ____ fragments melt over the summer months.

    Which of these words go in the above text?

    1. (a)     heading     (b)     backing     (c)     stomaching     (d)     footing    
    2. (a)     tacking     (b)     ticking     (c)     tracking     (d)     trucking    
    3. (a)     carved     (b)     caved     (c)     calved     (d)     clad    
    4. (a)     End     (b)     Side     (c)     Back     (d)     Front    
    5. (a)     jog     (b)     walk     (c)     run     (d)     trot    
    6. (a)     emerged     (b)     submerged     (c)     submarine     (d)     subjective    
    7. (a)     posses     (b)     poses     (c)     poises     (d)     posies    
    8. (a)     dystrophy     (b)     catastrophe     (c)     atrophy     (d)     trophy    
    9. (a)     blanking     (b)     squirming     (c)     foraging     (d)     deducing    
    10. (a)     moribund     (b)     rescind     (c)     blend     (d)     grind    
    11. (a)     to     (b)     of     (c)     as     (d)     by    
    12. (a)     situational     (b)     statuary     (c)     stationery     (d)     stationary

    Spelling

    Paragraph 1

    1. An oosermnu iceberg
    2. It actually ecalvd from the Larsen C ice shelf
    3. put the chunks on a rtcjoteayr
    4. run anrudog off the coast
    5. the three fartnmseg
    6. The ermeugsdb part of one chunk

    Paragraph 2

    1. an environmental phrcateoats
    2. gornifga for fish
    3. penguin osnieocl
    4. during the giebrned season
    5. disrupt tiealedc underwater ecosystems
    6. This could be eraebtdcxae

    Put the text back together

    (...)  with the seabed, they could obstruct penguins and seals from foraging for fish. They could also block the
    (...)  three large chunks. Scientists from NASA have been tracking the berg - dubbed A68a - for several
    (...)  underside of the fragments could grind the seabed near South Georgia and disrupt delicate underwater
    (...)  Circumpolar Current Front has put the chunks on a trajectory that means they could run
    (...)  since. In recent weeks, a fast-moving stream of water known as the Southern Antarctic
    (...)  of South Georgia. There could be an environmental catastrophe waiting to happen. If the three mini icebergs collide
    (...)  weeks. It actually calved from the Larsen C ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever
    (...)  2,600 square kilometres in size. The submerged part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.
    1  ) An enormous iceberg that is heading toward the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into
    (...)  route between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during the breeding season. Scientists worry the
    (...)  The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks poses a serious threat to the wildlife
    (...)  water to the ecosystems as the stationary fragments melt over the summer months.
    (...)  aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say the three fragments are roughly
    (...)  ecosystems. This could be exacerbated by the introduction of a mass of fresh

    Put the words in the right order

    1. been   Scientists   from   NASA   have   tracking   berg   .   the
    2. actually   shelf   .   the   ice   calved   It   Larsen   C   from
    3. means   could   they   trajectory   aground   .   A   that   run
    4. 2,600 square   are   roughly   Three  fragments   in   kilometres   size   .
    5. submerged.   is   The   part   of   106 metres   one   chunk
    6. sheer   three   bulk   chunks   .   The   the   of   iceberg
    7. The   with   the   mini   three   icebergs   collide   seabed   .
    8. the   underside   the   fragments   The   of   grinds   seabed   .
    9. water   .   fresh   introduction   of   The   mass   of   a
    10. melt   fragments   summer   months   .   The   over   stationary   the

    Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

    An enormous iceberg that is necking / heading toward the island of South Georgia in the southern Atlantic Ocean has broken up into three large chunks. Scientists from NASA have been tacking / tracking the berg - dubbed A68a - for several / severe weeks. It actually calved / caved from the Larsen C ice case / shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since / for. In recent weeks, a fast-moving stream of water known was / as the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front has put the chunks on a trajectory / tragedy that means they could run aground off the coast of South Georgia. Scientists say the three fragments are smoothly / roughly 2,600 square kilometres in size. The emerged / submerged part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point.

    The sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks posies / poses a serious threat / treat to the wildlife of South Georgia. There could be an environmental catastrophic / catastrophe waiting to happen. If the three mini icebergs collide with the seabed, they could obstruct / destruct penguins and seals from foraging for fish. They could also block the route between penguin colonies and their feeding / bleating grounds during the bred / breeding season. Scientists worry the underside / offside of the fragments could grind the seabed near South Georgia and disrupt despicable / delicate underwater ecosystems. This could be enunciated / exacerbated by the introduction of a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the stationary / stationery fragments melt over the summer months.

    Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

    Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

    _n  _n_rm__s  _c_b_rg  th_t  _s  h__d_ng  t_w_rd  th_  _sl_nd  _f  S__th  G__rg__  _n  th_  s__th_rn  _tl_nt_c  _c__n  h_s  br_k_n  _p  _nt_  thr__  l_rg_  ch_nks.  Sc__nt_sts  fr_m  N_S_  h_v_  b__n  tr_ck_ng  th_  b_rg  -  d_bb_d  _68_ -  f_r  s_v_r_l  w__ks.  _t  _ct__lly  c_lv_d  fr_m  th_  L_rs_n  C  _c_  sh_lf  _n  2017  _nd  h_s  b__n  fl__t_ng  n_rthw_rds  _v_r  s_nc_.  _n  r_c_nt  w__ks,  _  f_st-m_v_ng  str__m  _f  w_t_r  kn_wn  _s  th_  S__th_rn  _nt_rct_c  C_rc_mp_l_r  C_rr_nt  Fr_nt  h_s  p_t  th_  ch_nks  _n  _  tr_j_ct_ry  th_t  m__ns  th_y  c__ld  r_n  _gr__nd  _ff  th_  c__st  _f  S__th  G__rg__.  Sc__nt_sts  s_y  th_  thr__  fr_gm_nts  _r_  r__ghly  2,600  sq__r_  k_l_m_tr_s  _n  s_z_.  Th_  s_bm_rg_d  p_rt  _f  _n_  ch_nk  _s  106  m_tr_s  _t  _ts  th_ck_st  p__nt.

    Th_  sh__r  b_lk  _f  th_  thr__  _c_b_rg  ch_nks  p_s_s  _  s_r___s  thr__t  t_  th_  w_ldl_f_  _f  S__th  G__rg__.  Th_r_  c__ld  b_  _n  _nv_r_nm_nt_l  c_t_str_ph_  w__t_ng  t_  h_pp_n.  _f  th_  thr__  m_n_  _c_b_rgs  c_ll_d_  w_th  th_  s__b_d,  th_y  c__ld  _bstr_ct  p_ng__ns  _nd  s__ls  fr_m  f_r_g_ng  f_r  f_sh.  Th_y  c__ld  _ls_  bl_ck  th_  r__t_  b_tw__n  p_ng__n  c_l_n__s  _nd  th__r  f__d_ng  gr__nds  d_r_ng  th_  br__d_ng  s__s_n.  Sc__nt_sts  w_rry  th_  _nd_rs_d_  _f  th_  fr_gm_nts  c__ld  gr_nd  th_  s__b_d  n__r  S__th  G__rg__  _nd  d_sr_pt  d_l_c_t_  _nd_rw_t_r  _c_syst_ms.  Th_s  c__ld  b_  _x_c_rb_t_d  by  th_  _ntr_d_ct__n  _f  _  m_ss  _f  fr_sh  w_t_r  t_  th_  _c_syst_ms  _s  th_  st_t__n_ry  fr_gm_nts  m_lt  _v_r  th_  s_mm_r  m_nths.

    Punctuate the text and add capitals

    an enormous iceberg that is heading toward the island of south georgia in the southern atlantic ocean has broken up into three large chunks scientists from nasa have been tracking the berg  dubbed a68a  for several weeks it actually calved from the larsen c ice shelf in 2017 and has been floating northwards ever since in recent weeks a fastmoving stream of water known as the southern antarctic circumpolar current front has put the chunks on a trajectory that means they could run aground off the coast of south georgia scientists say the three fragments are roughly 2600 square kilometres in size the submerged part of one chunk is 106 metres at its thickest point

    the sheer bulk of the three iceberg chunks poses a serious threat to the wildlife of south georgia there could be an environmental catastrophe waiting to happen if the three mini icebergs collide with the seabed they could obstruct penguins and seals from foraging for fish they could also block the route between penguin colonies and their feeding grounds during the breeding season scientists worry the underside of the fragments could grind the seabed near south georgia and disrupt delicate underwater ecosystems this could be exacerbated by the introduction of a mass of fresh water to the ecosystems as the stationary fragments melt over the summer months

    Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

    AnenormousicebergthatisheadingtowardtheislandofSouthGeorgiai
    nthesouthernAtlanticOceanhasbrokenupintothreelargechunks.Scie
    ntistsfromNASAhavebeentrackingtheberg-dubbedA68a-forsever
    alweeks.ItactuallycalvedfromtheLarsenCiceshelfin2017andhasbee
    nfloatingnorthwardseversince.Inrecentweeks,afast-movingstrea
    mofwaterknownastheSouthernAntarcticCircumpolarCurrentFronth
    asputthechunksonatrajectorythatmeanstheycouldrunagroundoffth
    ecoastofSouthGeorgia.Scientistssaythethreefragmentsareroughly2
    ,600squarekilometresinsize.Thesubmergedpartofonechunkis106m
    etresatitsthickestpoint.Thesheerbulkofthethreeicebergchunkspose
    saseriousthreattothewildlifeofSouthGeorgia.Therecouldbeanenviro
    nmentalcatastrophewaitingtohappen.Ifthethreeminiicebergscollide
    withtheseabed,theycouldobstructpenguinsandsealsfromforagingfo
    rfish.Theycouldalsoblocktheroutebetweenpenguincoloniesandtheirf
    eedinggroundsduringthebreedingseason.Scientistsworrytheunders
    ideofthefragmentscouldgrindtheseabednearSouthGeorgiaanddisru
    ptdelicateunderwaterecosystems.Thiscouldbeexacerbatedbytheint
    roductionofamassoffreshwatertotheecosystemsasthestationaryfra
    gmentsmeltoverthesummermonths.

    Free writing

    Write about iceberg A68a for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

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    Academic writing

    There is no way to repair the damage global warming is doing. Discuss.

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    Homework

    1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.
    2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about this news story. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.
    3. ICEBERGS: Make a poster about icebergs. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?
    4. GLOBAL WARMING: Write a magazine article about everyone halving their carbon footprint to slow down global warming. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.
    Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).
    5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.
    6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on icebergs. Ask him/her three questions about icebergs. Give him/her three of your ideas. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

    Answers

    (Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

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