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Date: Feb 24, 2008
Downloads: Word Doc | PDF Doc | Listening
Audio: 2:11 - 513.4KB - 32kbps
Online Test: Recreate the text in this online test.

1,000 IDEAS FOR ESL CLASSES: Breaking News English.com's e-Book

THE ARTICLE

Afternoon naps increase risk of stroke

People used to believe that taking an afternoon nap was good for their health. However, according to a new report, daytime dozing may actually harm our health, especially in the elderly. A team of American researchers told the recent International Stroke Conference that older people who regularly napped were more likely to suffer a stroke. Their research showed that “some dozing” increased the risk of a stroke by up to 2.6 times, compared with those who never took naps. “Significant dozing” meant the risk was 4.5 times higher. The researchers said that the habit of napping may be an early warning sign of a future stroke. The team leader, Dr Bernadette Boden-Albala advised doctors to keep a check on older people who often dozed off. She said: “If patients are moderately or significantly dozing, physicians need to think about sending them for further evaluation."


 
 

In the two-and-a-half-year study, the team asked 2,000 people how often they dozed off in different situations. These included while watching TV, sitting and chatting to someone, relaxing after lunch, and stopping in traffic while driving. All the participants were aged 40 or above and none had previously suffered a stroke. The team’s findings were adjusted to take into account traditional stroke risk factors, such as age, race, gender, education, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and levels of exercise. Dr Boden-Albala suggested we need to question what is healthiest for us, saying “sleepiness obviously puts us at risk of stroke". She added this was important to ask because other studies show that people do not get enough sleep, which makes them constantly tired. The study’s findings may not be comfortable reading for those in countries where siestas are common.

WARM-UPS

1. TAKING A NAP: Walk around the class and talk to other students about taking a nap. Change partners often. After you finish, sit with your original partner(s) and share what you found out.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words from the article are most interesting and which are most boring.

 

afternoon naps / the elderly / strokes / early warning signs / risk / doctors / watching TV / chatting / relaxing after lunch / gender / getting enough sleep

Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.

3. EARLY WARNING SIGNS: Scientists often discover strange things. With your partner(s), imagine what dangers to our bodies these “early warning signs” might represent. Change partners and share what you talked about.

“Early warning sign”

Possible dangers

Remedy

a.    Afternoon napping

b.    Forgetting people’s names

c.     Daydreaming

d.    Stiff shoulders

e.    Being bored of going shopping

f.     Complaining about younger people

4. NAPS: With your partner, talk about the best place to take a nap. Rank them in order of the best quality nap. Change partners and share your ideas and findings

  1. _____   in English class
  2. _____   on a train or bus
  3. _____   on the sofa after lunch
  4. _____   in a hot bath
  5. _____   in the park
  6. _____   while watching TV

5. STROKE: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word ‘stroke’. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.

6. QUICK ROLE PLAY: Students A strongly believe that sleep is a waste of valuable time; Students B strongly believe sleep is one of the best things in life. Change partners again and talk about your roles and conversations.


 
 

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Look at the article’s headline and guess whether these sentences are true (T) or false (F):

a.

Dozing off in the afternoon could be dangerous to teenagers.

T / F

b.

People who sometimes napped didn’t increase their risk of a stroke.

T / F

c.

Heavy dozers were 4.5 times more likely to suffer a stroke.

T / F

d.

A researcher suggested doctors should ask about sleeping habits.

T / F

e.

A study into dozing off and strokes took two-and-a-half years.

T / F

f.

Everyone in the study was over 50 years old.

T / F

g.

The study considered things like age, sex and physical activity.

T / F

h.

The study is welcome news for people who like having a siesta.

T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article:

1.

nap

a.

changed

2

elderly

b.

clearly

3.

regularly

c.

circumstances

4.

physicians

d.

earlier

5.

evaluation

e.

doctors

6.

situations

f.

conclusions

7.

previously

g.

frequently

8.

adjusted

h.

shut-eye

9.

obviously

i.

examination

10.

findings

j.

aged

3. PHRASE MATCH: Match the following phrases from the article (sometimes more than one combination is possible):

1.

taking an afternoon nap was good

a.

different situations

2

daytime dozing may actually

b.

was 4.5 times higher

3.

more likely to suffer

c.

at risk

4.

Significant dozing meant the risk

d.

harm our health

5.

keep a check

e.

suffered a stroke

6.

how often they dozed off in

f.

for their health

7.

none had previously

g.

reading

8.

take into account traditional

h.

a stroke

9.

sleepiness obviously puts us

i.

stroke risk factors

10.

The study’s findings may not be comfortable

j.

on older people

WHILE READING / LISTENING

GAP FILL: Put the words into the gaps in the text.

People used to __________ that taking an afternoon nap was good for their health. However, __________ to a new report, daytime dozing may actually harm our health, especially in the __________. A team of American researchers told the recent International Stroke Conference that older people who regularly napped were more __________ to suffer a stroke. Their research showed that “some dozing” increased the risk of a stroke by up to 2.6 times, compared with those who never took naps. “Significant dozing” __________ the risk was 4.5 times higher. The researchers said that the habit of napping may be an early warning sign of a __________ stroke. The team leader, Dr Bernadette Boden-Albala advised doctors to keep a __________ on older people who often dozed off. She said: “If patients are moderately or significantly dozing, physicians need to think about sending them for further __________."

 

meant
according
evaluation
likely
elderly
check
believe
future

In the two-and-a-half-year study, the team asked 2,000 people how often they dozed off in different __________. These included while watching TV, sitting and chatting to someone, __________ after lunch, and stopping in traffic while driving. All the participants were aged 40 or above and none had __________ suffered a stroke. The team’s findings were adjusted to take into __________ traditional stroke risk factors, such as age, race, gender, education, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and __________ of exercise. Dr Boden-Albala suggested we need to question what is healthiest for us, saying “sleepiness __________ puts us at risk of stroke". She added this was important to ask because other studies show that people do not get enough sleep, which makes them __________ tired. The study’s findings may not be comfortable reading for those in countries where siestas are __________.

 

obviously
 previously

levels
common
situations
constantly
account
relaxing

LISTENING:  Listen and fill in the spaces.

People ______________________ taking an afternoon nap was good for their health. However, according to a new report, daytime dozing may ________________ health, especially in the elderly. A team of American researchers told the recent International Stroke Conference that older people who regularly napped ______________________ suffer a stroke. Their research showed that “some dozing” increased the risk of a stroke by up to 2.6 times, ______________________ never took naps. “Significant dozing” meant the risk was 4.5 times higher. The researchers said that the _______________________ be an early warning sign of a future stroke. The team leader, Dr Bernadette Boden-Albala advised doctors to keep a check on older people who often dozed off. She said: “If patients are moderately or significantly dozing, physicians ______________________ sending them for further evaluation."

In the two-and-a-half-year study, the team asked 2,000 people how often ______________________ different situations. These included while watching TV, sitting and chatting to someone, relaxing after lunch, and stopping in ______________________. All the participants were aged 40 or above and none had previously suffered a stroke. The team’s findings were adjusted ______________________ traditional stroke risk factors, such as age, race, gender, education, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and levels of exercise. Dr Boden-Albala suggested we need to question what is healthiest for us, saying “sleepiness ______________________ risk of stroke". She added this was important to ask because other studies show that people do not get enough sleep, which ______________________ tired. The study’s findings may not be comfortable reading for those in countries ______________________.


 
 

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionaries / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words ‘warning’ and ‘sign’.

warning

sign

 

 

 

  • Share your findings with your partners.
  • Make questions using the words you found.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

  • Share your questions with other classmates / groups.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall exactly how these were used in the text:

  • used to
  • actually
  • regularly
  • compared
  • check
  • further
  • situations
  • traffic
  • adjusted
  • question
  • constantly
  • common

STUDENT SLEEP SURVEY

Write five GOOD questions about sleep in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper.

When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

STUDENT 1

_____________

STUDENT 2

_____________

STUDENT 3

_____________

Q.1.

Q.2.

Q.3.

Q.4.

Q.5.

  • Now return to your original partner and share and talk about what you found out. Change partners often.
  • Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings.

DISCUSSION

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

a)

What did you think when you read the headline?

b)

What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘nap’?

c)

How often do you take a nap?

d)

Do you think the findings of this research makes sense?

e)

Why do you think taking a nap can increase the risk of a stroke?

f)

What do you know about strokes and heart attacks?

g)

Other studies say taking a nap is good for us. What do you think?

h)

Do you get enough sleep?

i)

What other early warning signs of stroke and heart disease do you know of?

--------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

a)

Did you like reading this article?

b)

Where and when is your favourite place to take a nap?

c)

Have you ever dozed off when you shouldn’t have?

d)

What do you think of dozing off in lessons?

e)

When was the sleepiest you have ever been?

f)

Do you think sleeping can be a waste of time?

g)

Do you think people in countries where siestas are common will worry about this report?

h)

What questions would you like to ask Dr Boden-Albala?

i)

Did you like this discussion? Why (not)?

LANGUAGE

CORRECT WORD: Put the correct words from a–d below in the article.

People used to believe that (1) ____ an afternoon nap was good for their health. However, according to a new report, daytime dozing may actually  (2) ____ our health, especially in the elderly. A team of American researchers told the (3) ____ International Stroke Conference that older people who regularly napped were more (4) ____ to suffer a stroke. Their research showed that “some dozing” increased the risk of a stroke by up to 2.6 times, compared with those who never took naps. “Significant dozing” meant the (5) ____ was 4.5 times higher. The researchers said that the habit of napping may be an early warning sign of a future stroke. The team leader, Dr Bernadette Boden-Albala advised doctors to keep a (6) ____ on older people who often dozed off. She said: “If patients are moderately or significantly dozing, physicians need to think about sending them for further evaluation."

In the two-and-a-half-year study, the team asked 2,000 people how often they dozed off (7) ____ different situations. These included while watching TV, sitting and chatting to someone, relaxing after lunch, and stopping in traffic (8) ____ driving. All the participants were aged 40 or above and none had (9) ____ suffered a stroke. The team’s findings were adjusted to take into account traditional stroke risk factors, such as age, race, (10) ____, education, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and levels of exercise. Dr Boden-Albala suggested we need to question what is healthiest for us, saying “sleepiness obviously puts us (11) ____ risk of stroke". She added this was important to ask because other studies show that people do not get enough sleep, which makes them constantly tired. The study’s findings may not be (12) ____ reading for those in countries where siestas are common.

1.

(a)

taken

(b)

take

(c)

taking

(d)

takes

2.

(a)

harm

(b)

harmful

(c)

harms

(d)

harmless

3.

(a)

resent

(b)

recently

(c)

recentness

(d)

recent

4.

(a)

like

(b)

likely

(c)

likes

(d)

liked

5.

(a)

risky

(b)

risk

(c)

risqué

(d)

risked

6.

(a)

check

(b)

cheek

(c)

cheque

(d)

checked

7.

(a)

by

(b)

for

(c)

in

(d)

on

8.

(a)

whiling

(b)

whiles

(c)

whiled

(d)

while

9.

(a)

periodically

(b)

preciously

(c)

precisely

(d)

previously

10.

(a)

gender

(b)

gentler

(c)

gander

(d)

gender gap

11.

(a)

to

(b)

at

(c)

for

(d)

of

12.

(a)

snug

(b)

cozy

(c)

comfortable

(d)

relaxed

WRITING: 

Write about napping for 10 minutes. Correct your partner’s paper.

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about the health benefits of sleep. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. SLEEP: Make a poster about your different sleeping patterns. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?

4. ANTI-SLEEP PILL: Write a magazine article about an anti-sleep pill that gives your body all the rest it needs without the need to sleep. Include imaginary interviews with the inventor and a doctor who disagrees with the pill.

Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down new words and expressions.

5. LETTER: Write a letter to Dr Boden-Albala. Ask her three questions about her study. Give her three reasons why you agree or disagree with her findings. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

ANSWERS

TRUE / FALSE:

a. F

b. F

c. T

d. T

e. T

f. F

g. T

h. F

SYNONYM MATCH:

1.

nap

a.

shut-eye

2

elderly

b.

aged

3.

regularly

c.

frequently

4.

physicians

d.

doctors

5.

evaluation

e.

examination

6.

situations

f.

circumstances

7.

previously

g.

earlier

8.

adjusted

h.

changed

9.

obviously

i.

clearly

10.

findings

j.

conclusions

PHRASE MATCH:

1.

taking an afternoon nap was good

a.

for their health

2

daytime dozing may actually

b.

harm our health

3.

more likely to suffer

c.

a stroke

4.

Significant dozing meant the risk

d.

was 4.5 times higher

5.

keep a check

e.

on older people

6.

how often they dozed off in

f.

different situations

7.

none had previously

g.

suffered a stroke

8.

take into account traditional

h.

stroke risk factors

9.

sleepiness obviously puts us

i.

at risk

10.

The study’s findings may not be comfortable

j.

reading

GAP FILL:

Afternoon naps increase risk of stroke

People used to believe that taking an afternoon nap was good for their health. However, according to a new report, daytime dozing may actually harm our health, especially in the elderly. A team of American researchers told the recent International Stroke Conference that older people who regularly napped were more likely to suffer a stroke. Their research showed that “some dozing” increased the risk of a stroke by up to 2.6 times, compared with those who never took naps. “Significant dozing” meant the risk was 4.5 times higher. The researchers said that the habit of napping may be an early warning sign of a future stroke. The team leader, Dr Bernadette Boden-Albala advised doctors to keep a check on older people who often dozed off. She said: “If patients are moderately or significantly dozing, physicians need to think about sending them for further evaluation."

In the two-and-a-half-year study, the team asked 2,000 people how often they dozed off in different situations. These included while watching TV, sitting and chatting to someone, relaxing after lunch, and stopping in traffic while driving. All the participants were aged 40 or above and none had previously suffered a stroke. The team’s findings were adjusted to take into account traditional stroke risk factors, such as age, race, gender, education, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and levels of exercise. Dr Boden-Albala suggested we need to question what is healthiest for us, saying “sleepiness obviously puts us at risk of stroke". She added this was important to ask because other studies show that people do not get enough sleep, which makes them constantly tired. The study’s findings may not be comfortable reading for those in countries where siestas are common.

LANGUAGE WORK

1 - c

2 - a

3 - d

4 - b

5 - b

6 - a

7 - c

8 - d

9 - d

10 - a

11 - b

12 - c

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