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January 29, 2010

PRINT:  13-Page Class Handout
LISTEN: MP3 (2:09 - 1,000KB)
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Jogging Barefoot Healthier Than In Shoes

Jogging barefoot might be better for you than running in jogging shoes. This is the conclusion of new research from scientists at Glasgow University in Scotland. In fact, researchers say running with jogging shoes may actually be harmful to our bodies. The research team found that 75 per cent of the joggers in their study experienced something called ‘heel strike’. This is when our heels hit the ground too hard and shock our skeleton. This happens around 1,000 times for every 1.5km we run. The scientists say running barefoot is more natural. People who run without shoes do not land on their heels an this avoids sending shockwaves throughout their body. Barefoot runners may be at less risk of injury than those who wear running shoes.


The research helps explain why many long-distance runners run so well barefoot. The scientists say jogging shoes actually get in the way of millions of years of evolution: “Humans have engaged in endurance running for millions of years, but the modern running shoe was not invented until the 1970s.” They added: “For most of human history, runners were either barefoot or wore minimal footwear such as sandals…with…little cushioning.” Barefoot running is common in many parts of the world, especially Africa. The most famous barefoot runner is South Africa’s Zola Budd, who ran without shoes in the 1984 Olympics. Dr Daniel Lieberman from Harvard University warns people to start slowly if they take up running barefoot to avoid injury.


 
 

WARM-UPS

1. RUNNING: Walk around the class and talk to other students about running. Change partners often. Sit with your first partner(s) and share your findings.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words from the article are most interesting and which are most boring.

 

jogging / being barefoot / research / heels / skeletons / shockwaves / injuries / long-distance runners / running shoes / evolution / endurance / footwear / sandals

Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.

3. BAREFOOT: Should we do more things barefoot? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners and share what you wrote. Change partners and share again.

 

pros

cons

running

 

 

playing football

 

 

working

 

 

hiking

 

 

shopping

 

 

driving

 

 

4. NO SHOES: Students A strongly believe running with no jogging shoes is better than running without them; Students B strongly believe the opposite.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations.

5. UNNECESSARY: Do we really need these things? Rate them and share your ratings with your partner: 10 = totally necessary; 1 = absolutely unnecessary. Change partners and share your ratings again.

  • running shoes
  • ties
  • cosmetics
  • watches
  • suits
  • hats
  • belts
  • socks

6. RUN: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word ‘run’. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.


 
 

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if  a-h  below are true (T) or false (F).

a.

Jogging with nothing on your feet might be healthier than with shoes.

T / F

b.

Scientists believe jogging shoes could damage your health.

T / F

c.

Something called ‘heel shock’ happens after running 1,500 metres.

T / F

d.

Barefoot runners land on their heels when they run.

T / F

e.

Research explains why barefooted runners do well at long distances.

T / F

f.

Modern running shoes were not really available five decades ago.

T / F

g.

A famous barefoot runner called Zola Budd ran in the 2004 Olympics.

T / F

h.

A Harvard University doctor advised people to run quickly in bare feet.

T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

1.

might

a.

padding

2

conclusion

b.

strike

3.

harmful

c.

participated

4.

hit

d.

findings

5.

throughout

e.

keep away from

6.

engaged

f.

start

7.

cushioning

g.

could

8.

especially

h.

all over

9.

take up

i.

particularly

10.

avoid

j.

damaging

3. PHRASE MATCH:  (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

1.

might be better

a.

running barefoot

2

the conclusion of

b.

risk of injury

3.

be harmful

c.

ground too hard

4.

our heels hit the

d.

of evolution

5.

runners may be at less

e.

invented until the 1970s

6.

long-distance runners run

f.

for you

7.

millions of years

g.

parts of the world

8.

the modern running shoe was not

h.

new research

9.

common in many

i.

so well barefoot

10.

take up

j.

to our bodies

 

WHILE READING / LISTENING

GAP FILL: Put the words into the gaps in the text.

Jogging barefoot ____________ be better for you than running in jogging shoes. This is the ____________ of new research from scientists at Glasgow University in Scotland. In fact, researchers say running with jogging shoes may actually be ____________ to our bodies. The research team found that 75 per cent of the joggers in their study experienced ____________ called ‘heel strike’. This is when our heels hit the ____________ too hard and shock our skeleton. This happens around 1,000 times for every 1.5km we run. The scientists say running barefoot is more ____________. People who run without shoes do not land on their heels and this ____________ sending shockwaves throughout their body. Barefoot runners may be at ____________ risk of injury than those who wear running shoes.

 

 

 

something
conclusion
avoids
natural
might
less
harmful
ground

The research helps ____________ why many long-distance runners run so well barefoot. The scientists say jogging shoes actually get in the way of ____________ of years of evolution: “Humans have engaged in endurance running for millions of years, but the ____________ running shoe was not invented until the 1970s.” They added: “For most of human ____________, runners were either barefoot or wore minimal footwear such as sandals…with…little cushioning.” Barefoot running is ____________ in many parts of the world, especially Africa. The most ____________ barefoot runner is South Africa’s Zola Budd, who ran without shoes in the 1984 Olympics. Dr Daniel Lieberman from Harvard University ____________ people to start slowly if they take up running barefoot to ____________ injury.

 

 

famous
millions
avoid
warns
history
explain
modern
common

LISTENING – Listen and fill in the gaps

Jogging barefoot might _________________ than running in jogging shoes. This is the conclusion of new research from scientists at Glasgow University in Scotland. In fact, researchers say running with jogging shoes may actually _________________ bodies. The research team found that 75 per cent of the joggers in their study experienced something called ‘heel strike’. This is _________________ the ground too hard and shock our skeleton. This happens around 1,000 _________________ 1.5km we run. The scientists say running barefoot is more natural. People who run without shoes do not land on their heels _________________ sending shockwaves throughout their body. Barefoot runners may _________________ injury than those who wear running shoes.

The research helps explain why many long-distance runners _________________ barefoot. The scientists say jogging shoes actually get in the way of millions of years of evolution: “Humans _________________ endurance running for millions of years, but the modern running shoe was _________________ the 1970s.” They added: “For most of human history, runners were either barefoot _________________ footwear such as sandals…with…little cushioning.” Barefoot running is common in many parts of the world, especially Africa. The most famous barefoot runner is South Africa’s Zola Budd, _________________ shoes in the 1984 Olympics. Dr Daniel Lieberman from Harvard University warns people to start slowly if they take up running barefoot _________________.


 
 

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words ‘running’ and ‘shoe’.

running

shoe

 

 

 

  • Share your findings with your partners.
  • Make questions using the words you found.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

  • Share your questions with other classmates / groups.
  • Ask your partner / group your questions.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

  • better
  • harmful
  • heels
  • skeleton
  • avoids
  • risk
  • distance
  • evolution
  • the 1970s
  • minimal
  • parts
  • slowly

STUDENT RUNNING SURVEY

Write five GOOD questions about running in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper.

When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

 

STUDENT 1

_____________

STUDENT 2

_____________

STUDENT 3

_____________

Q.1.

 

 

 

 

Q.2.

 

 

 

 

Q.3.

 

 

 

 

Q.4.

 

 

 

 

Q.5.

 

 

 

 

  • Now return to your original partner and share and talk about what you found out. Change partners often.
  • Make mini-presentations to other groups on your findings.

RUNNING DISCUSSION

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

a)

What did you think when you read the headline?

b)

What springs to mind when you hear the word ‘running’?

c)

Do you thing jogging barefoot is better than with running shoes?

d)

What experience do you have of running barefoot?

e)

Do you believe running with jogging shoes is harmful to our bodies?

f)

Why do people like running?

g)

What is your history of running?

h)

Do you like wearing running shoes? Why?

i)

Do you think we should all take up running?

j)

Would you throw away your running shoes after reading this article?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

a)

Did you like reading this article?

b)

What do you think of long-distance running?

c)

Do you think evolution designed us to run barefoot?

d)

Would people be able to run faster without running shoes?

e)

Do we need all the different kinds of shoes we have?

f)

What would you think if schools banned running shoes in sports classes?

g)

What harm can jogging do to us?

h)

When and why do you think jogging became a hobby?

i)

Is your country jogging mad?

j)

What questions would you like to ask the researchers?

LANGUAGE – MULTIPLE CHOICE

Jogging barefoot might be better for you than running (1) ____ jogging shoes. This is the conclusion of new research from scientists at Glasgow University in Scotland. In fact, researchers say running with jogging shoes may actually be harmful (2) ____ our bodies. The research team found that 75 per cent of the joggers in their study experienced something called ‘(3) ____ strike’. This is when our heels hit the ground too hard and (4) ____ our skeleton. This happens around 1,000 times for every 1.5km we run. The scientists say running barefoot is (5) ____ natural. People who run without shoes do not land on their heels and this avoids sending shockwaves throughout their body. Barefoot runners may be at (6) ____ risk of injury than those who wear running shoes.

The research helps (7) ____ why many long-distance runners run so well barefoot. The scientists say jogging shoes actually get (8) ____ the way of millions of years of evolution: “Humans have engaged in endurance running for millions of years, but the modern running shoe was not (9) ____ until the 1970s.” They added: “For most of human history, runners were either barefoot or wore minimal footwear such (10) ____ sandals…with…little cushioning.” Barefoot running is common in many (11) ____ of the world, especially Africa. The most famous barefoot runner is South Africa’s Zola Budd, who ran without shoes in the 1984 Olympics. Dr Daniel Lieberman from Harvard University warns people to start slowly if they (12) ____ up running barefoot to avoid injury.

Put the correct words from the table below in the above article.

1.

(a)

in

(b)

on

(c)

up

(d)

to

2.

(a)

on

(b)

to

(c)

at

(d)

of

3.

(a)

wheel

(b)

heal

(c)

heel

(d)

healing

4.

(a)

shocking

(b)

shocker

(c)

shocks

(d)

shock

5.

(a)

than

(b)

then

(c)

much

(d)

more

6.

(a)

least

(b)

lost

(c)

less

(d)

lest

7.

(a)

explain

(b)

explained

(c)

explanation

(d)

explaining

8.

(a)

of

(b)

in

(c)

to

(d)

up

9.

(a)

invention

(b)

invents

(c)

invented

(d)

inventing

10.

(a)

as

(b)

has

(c)

was

(d)

pas

11.

(a)

part

(b)

parties

(c)

parted

(d)

parts

12.

(a)

make

(b)

take

(c)

wake

(d)

fake

WRITING

Write about running for 10 minutes. Correct your partner’s paper.

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

HOMEWORK

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about running barefoot. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. RUNNING: Make a poster about running. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?

4. SEALING: Write a magazine article about running barefoot. Include imaginary interviews with a barefoot runner and a jogger who prefers jogging shoes.

Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).

5. LETTER: Write a letter to a barefoot runner. Ask him/her three questions about running. Give him/her three opinions on running barefoot. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

ANSWERS

TRUE / FALSE:

a.

T

b.

T

c.

F

d.

F

e.

T

f.

T

g.

F

h.

F

SYNONYM MATCH:

1.

might

a.

could

2

conclusion

b.

findings

3.

harmful

c.

damaging

4.

hit

d.

strike

5.

throughout

e.

all over

6.

engaged

f.

participated

7.

cushioning

g.

padding

8.

especially

h.

particularly

9.

take up

i.

start

10.

avoid

j.

keep away from

PHRASE MATCH:

1.

might be better

a.

for you

2

the conclusion of

b.

new research

3.

be harmful

c.

to our bodies

4.

our heels hit the

d.

ground too hard

5.

runners may be at less

e.

risk of injury s

6.

long-distance runners run

f.

so well barefoot

7.

millions of years

g.

of evolution

8.

the modern running shoe was not

h.

invented until the 1970

9.

common in many

i.

parts of the world

10.

take up

j.

running barefoot

GAP FILL:

Jogging barefoot healthier than in shoes

Jogging barefoot might be better for you than running in jogging shoes. This is the conclusion of new research from scientists at Glasgow University in Scotland. In fact, researchers say running with jogging shoes may actually be harmful to our bodies. The research team found that 75 per cent of the joggers in their study experienced something called ‘heel strike’. This is when our heels hit the ground too hard and shock our skeleton. This happens around 1,000 times for every 1.5km we run. The scientists say running barefoot is more natural. People who run without shoes do not land on their heels and this avoids sending shockwaves throughout their body. Barefoot runners may be at less risk of injury than those who wear running shoes.

The research helps explain why many long-distance runners run so well barefoot. The scientists say jogging shoes actually get in the way of millions of years of evolution: “Humans have engaged in endurance running for millions of years, but the modern running shoe was not invented until the 1970s.” They added: “For most of human history, runners were either barefoot or wore minimal footwear such as sandals…with…little cushioning.” Barefoot running is common in many parts of the world, especially Africa. The most famous barefoot runner is South Africa’s Zola Budd, who ran without shoes in the 1984 Olympics. Dr Daniel Lieberman from Harvard University warns people to start slowly if they take up running barefoot to avoid injury.

LANGUAGE WORK

1 - a

2 - b

3 - c

4 - d

5 - d

6 - c

7 - a

8 - b

9 - c

10 - a

11 - d

12 - b

 

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