The Reading / Listening - Uluru - Level 6

People are now banned from climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous Australian culture. The world's largest monolith, the giant Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now officially off-limits to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in recognition of the site's cultural significance to the local Anangu traditional owners. The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it reverted to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major attraction for decades. Tourists from around the world have flocked there in droves to climb the rock. However, it is a sacred site in Anangu culture. The Anangu custodians of the rock have long campaigned for the ban.



The ban was initially announced in 2017 and most visitors complied with it. Australia's tourist association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up in a tiny community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a very sacred place. That's like our church. I've been telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our stories are on the rock. People right around the world come just to climb it. They've got no respect." Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that parliament house at Canberra, they wouldn't let me in."

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

    Uluru - Level 4  or  Uluru - Level 5

Sources
  • https://www.bbc.com/news/world-australia-50064572
  • https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6456290/ulurus-owners-face-future-without-climb/
  • https://www.sbs.com.au/news/a-controversial-chapter-in-uluru-s-long-history-will-close-this-weekend-for-good


Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)



Warm-ups

1. ULURU: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about Uluru. Change partners often and share your findings.
2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?
       climbing / indigenous / culture / desert / significance / attraction / decades / ban /
       initially / tourist / association / community / rock / sacred / resident / parliament
Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.
3. TOURISM: Students A strongly believe tourism is a great thing; Students B strongly believe tourism is a bad thing.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations.
4. ROCKS: What do you know about these rocks? What would you like to know? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.

 

Where Is It?

What I Know

What I Want To Know

Uluru

 

 

 

Stonehenge

 

 

 

The Blarney Stone

 

 

 

The Rosetta Stone

 

 

 

Mount Rushmore

 

 

 

The Black Stone of
the Kaaba

 

 

 

MY e-BOOK
ESL resource book with copiable worksheets and handouts - 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers / English teachers
See a sample

5. CLIMBING: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "climbing". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.
6. SITES: Rank these with your partner. Put the best sites at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • Uluru
  • Eiffel Tower
  • Table Mountain
  • Copacabana Beach
  • Mount Fuji
  • Taj Mahal
  • The Pyramids
  • The Great Wall of China

 

Vocabulary

    Paragraph 1

      1. sacred a. Out of bounds; not allowed in or near.
      2. indigenous b. Connected with God or the gods or dedicated to a religious purpose.
      3. monolith c. A large single upright block of stone.
      4. off-limits d. Moved as large groups of people.
      5. reverted e. A person who has responsibility for or looks after something.
      6. flocked f. Originating or occurring naturally in a particular place.
      7. custodian g. Returned to a previous state.

    Paragraph 2

      8. initially h. A group of people living together in one place.
      9. complied i. A place where a country's government meets.
      10. tiny j. A person who lives somewhere permanently or on a long-term basis.
      11. community k. Very, very small.
      12. respect l. A feeling of deep admiration for someone or something because of their abilities.
      13. resident m. At first.
      14. parliament n. Acted in accordance with a wish or command.

 

Before reading / listening

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if 1-8 below are true (T) or false (F).

  1. Only local people can climb Uluru after October 25.     T / F
  2. Uluru is now off-limits to tourists and climbers.     T / F
  3. The site Uluru was once known as Uluru Rock.     T / F
  4. The Anangu people refused to take part in a campaign to ban climbing.   T / F
  5. The first Uluru climbing ban was issued in 2017.     T / F
  6. Sixteen per cent of visitors have climbed Uluru since 2017.     T / F
  7. A local man said all his people's stories are written on Uluru.     T / F
  8. Another local man said he had climbed Australia's parliament building.     T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

  1. banned
  2. sacred
  3. off limits
  4. reverted
  5. campaigned
  6. initially
  7. complied with
  8. community
  9. climb
  10. resident
  1. citizen
  2. returned
  3. followed
  4. hallowed
  5. first
  6. scale
  7. prohibited
  8. fought
  9. neighborhood
  10. out of bounds

3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

  1. People are now banned
  2. one of the most sacred
  3. The world's largest monolith,
  4. before it reverted to its historic
  5. flocked there in
  6. The ban was initially
  7. grew up in a tiny
  8. how important the rock
  9. All of our stories are on
  10. on top of that parliament
  1. is to his people
  2. name of Uluru
  3. house
  4. sites
  5. the rock
  6. from climbing
  7. droves
  8. community
  9. the giant Uluru
  10. announced in 2017

Gap fill

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
attraction
off-limits
custodians
banned
reverted
culture
flocked
recognition

People are now (1) ____________ from climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous Australian (2) ____________. The world's largest monolith, the giant Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now officially (3) ____________ to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in (4) ____________ of the site's cultural significance to the local Anangu traditional owners. The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it (5) ____________ to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major (6) ____________ for decades. Tourists from around the world have (7) ____________ there in droves to climb the rock. However, it is a sacred site in Anangu culture. The Anangu (8) ____________ of the rock have long campaigned for the ban.

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
tiny
church parliament
association
respect
initially
sacred
stories

The ban was (9) ____________ announced in 2017 and most visitors complied with it. Australia's tourist (10) ____________ said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up in a (11) ____________ community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a very (12) ____________ place. That's like our (13) ____________. I've been telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our (14) ____________ are on the rock. People right around the world come just to climb it. They've got no (15) ____________." Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that (16) ____________ house at Canberra, they wouldn't let me in."

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1)  People are now banned from climbing one of the ______
     a.  most scared sites
     b.  most scarred sites
     c.  most sacred sites
     d.  most scored sites
2)  Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now ______
     a.  official down-limits
     b.  officially on-limits
     c.  official up-limits
     d.  officially off-limits
3)  It will be closed from October 25 in recognition of the site's ______
     a.  cultural significant
     b.  cultural significance
     c.  culturally significance
     d.  culturally significant
4)  The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it reverted to ______
     a.  its hysteric name
     b.  its historic name
     c.  its hysterics name
     d.  its hysterical name
5)  The Anangu custodians of the rock have long ______ the ban
     a.  campaign for
     b.  camp aimed for
     c.  cam pined for
     d.  campaigned for

6)  The ban was initially announced in 2017 and most visitors ______
     a.  complied with it
     b.  compiled with it
     c.  compiles with it
     d.  complier with it
7)  tourist association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually ______
     a.  climbed a rock
     b.  climbed their rock
     c.  climbed these rock
     d.  climbed the rock
8)  Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up in ______
     a.  a tinny community
     b.  a tiny community
     c.  a teeny community
     d.  a tints community
9)  People right around the world come just to climb it. They've ______
     a.  got no respective
     b.  got no respecter
     c.  got no respects
     d.  got no respect
10)  Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that ______..."
     a.  parliament house
     b.  parliament hill
     c.  parliament mountain
     d.  parliament rock

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

People are (1) ______________________ climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous Australian culture. The world's largest monolith, the giant Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, (2) ______________________ off-limits to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in recognition of the site's cultural significance to the local Anangu traditional owners. The giant site (3) ______________________ as Ayers Rock, before it reverted to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major (4) ______________________. Tourists from around the world have flocked there (5) ______________________ climb the rock. However, it is a sacred site in Anangu culture. The Anangu custodians of the rock (6) ______________________ for the ban.

The ban (7) ______________________ in 2017 and most visitors complied with it. Australia's tourist (8) ______________________ only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up (9) ______________________ community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a (10) ______________________. That's like our church. I've been telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our stories are on the rock. People right around the world come just to climb it. They've (11) ______________________." Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that (12) ______________________ Canberra, they wouldn't let me in."

Comprehension questions

  1. What is the world's largest monolith?
  2. Who are the Anangu people?
  3. What was Uluru once called?
  4. Who did the article say flocked to the rock in droves?
  5. What did the Anangu campaign for?
  6. When was an initial climbing ban introduced?
  7. What percentage of visitors has climbed Uluru since 2017?
  8. Where did Rameth Thomas grow up?
  9. What did Rameth Thomas say was on the rock?
  10. What did a local resident say he wouldn't be allowed to climb?




Multiple choice quiz

1) What is the world's largest monolith?
a) Stonehenge
b) Table Mountain
c) Uluru
d) The Great Wall of China
2) Who are the Anangu people?
a) Uluru's traditional owners
b) tourist operators
c) a group of climbers
d) a community in Canberra
3) What was Uluru once called?
a) Ayers Rock
b) Australia Rock
c) Uluru Rock
d) Northern Territory Rock
4) Who did the article say flocked to the rock in droves?
a) birds
b) tourists
c) sheep
d) photographers
5) What did the Anangu campaign for?
a) world peace
b) the restoration of Uluru
c) a total ban on tourists
d) a climbing ban

6) When was an initial climbing ban introduced?
a) 2015
b) 2017
c) 2013
d) 2011
7) What percentage of visitors has climbed Uluru since 2017?
a) 16%
b) 26%
c) 36%
d) 6%
8) Where did Rameth Thomas grow up?
a) Canberra
b) in New South Wales
c) near Uluru
d) New York
9) What did Rameth Thomas say was on the rock?
a) sacred water
b) spirits
c) paintings
d) stories
10) What did a local resident say he wouldn't be allowed to climb?
a) the parliament house in Canberra
b) Ayers Rock
c) the Olgas
d) a ladder

Role play

Role  A – Uluru
You think Uluru is the best site in the world. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their sites aren't as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): Mount Fuji, the Pyramids or the Eiffel Tower.

Role  B – Mount Fuji
You think Mount Fuji is the best site in the world. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their sites aren't as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): Uluru, the Pyramids or the Eiffel Tower.

Role  C – The Pyramids
You think the Pyramids is the best site in the world. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their sites aren't as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): Mount Fuji, Uluru or the Eiffel Tower.

Role  D – The Eiffel Tower
You think the Eiffel Tower is the best site in the world. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them why their sites aren't as good. Also, tell the others which is the least interesting of these (and why): Mount Fuji, the Pyramids or Uluru.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'sacred'

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • and 'site'.

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • • Share your findings with your partners.

    • Make questions using the words you found.

    • Ask your partner / group your questions.

    2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

    •Share your questions with other classmates / groups. •Ask your partner / group your questions.

    3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

    4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

    5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

    • now
    • giant
    • recognition
    • historic
    • flocked
    • long
    • initially
    • actually
    • tiny
    • sacred
    • right
    • let




    Student survey

    Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

    (Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

    Discussion - The climbing of Australia's Uluru now banned

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    1. What did you think when you read the headline?
    2. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'site'?
    3. What do you know about Uluru?
    4. Should Uluru be respected and not climbed?
    5. What is the most important site in your country?
    6. What do you think of sacred sites?
    7. What makes something sacred?
    8. Do you prefer the name Ayers Rock or Uluru?
    9. What things are sacred in your culture?
    10. Have you ever campaigned for something?

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    1. Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
    2. What do you think of when you hear the word 'sacred'?
    3. What do you think about what you read?
    4. Should giant rocks belong to a community?
    5. How important is it to protect indigenous culture?
    6. Where is your most sacred place?
    7. How can we understand more about the culture of places we visit?
    8. What three words best describe this story?
    9. What things have you climbed in your life?
    10. What questions would you like to ask the Anangu people?

    Discussion — Write your own questions

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    (a) ________________

    (b) ________________

    (c) ________________

    (d) ________________

    (e) ________________

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    (f) ________________

    (g) ________________

    (h) ________________

    (i) ________________

    (j) ________________





    Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

    People are now banned from climbing one of the most (1) ____ sites in indigenous Australian culture. The world's largest (2) ____, the giant Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now officially off-(3) ____ to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in recognition of the site's cultural significance to the local Anangu (4) ____ owners. The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it reverted to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major attraction for decades. Tourists from around the world have (5) ____ there in droves to climb the rock. However, it is a sacred site in Anangu culture. The Anangu custodians of the rock have (6) ____ campaigned for the ban.

    The ban was (7) ____ announced in 2017 and most visitors (8) ____ with it. Australia's tourist association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up in a (9) ____ community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a very sacred place. That's like our church. I've been telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our (10) ____ are on the rock. People right around the world come just to climb it. They've got no (11) ____." Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that parliament house at Canberra, they wouldn't (12) ____ me in."

    Which of these words go in the above text?

    1. (a)     scarred     (b)     sacred     (c)     scored     (d)     scared    
    2. (a)     mono     (b)     monolith     (c)     monopoly     (d)     monotony    
    3. (a)     limit     (b)     limitation     (c)     limited     (d)     limits    
    4. (a)     traditions     (b)     traditional     (c)     tradition     (d)     traditionally    
    5. (a)     herded     (b)     schooled     (c)     shepherded     (d)     flocked    
    6. (a)     short     (b)     wide     (c)     long     (d)     narrow    
    7. (a)     initially     (b)     initials     (c)     initial     (d)     initialize    
    8. (a)     compiled     (b)     compelled     (c)     complied     (d)     compliant    
    9. (a)     ting     (b)     tinge     (c)     tint     (d)     tiny    
    10. (a)     stories     (b)     stores     (c)     stares     (d)     steers    
    11. (a)     respect     (b)     reserve     (c)     resolve     (d)     result    
    12. (a)     let     (b)     put     (c)     run     (d)     climb

    Spelling

    Paragraph 1

    1. in osnngeiudi Australian culture
    2. now flciyolafi off-limits
    3. the site's cultural sagcfcininie
    4. it rvteered to its historic name
    5. sstoaiundc of the rock
    6. anamidecgp for the ban

    Paragraph 2

    1. The ban was ilailytni announced in 2017
    2. most visitors eopcmild with it
    3. tourist ssiotcaanio
    4. grew up in a tiny ciotmunmy
    5. another serndtie
    6. amenrlpita house

    Put the text back together

    (...)  climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our stories are on the rock. People right around
    (...)  around the world have flocked there in droves to climb the rock. However, it is a sacred
    (...)  the world come just to climb it. They've got no respect." Another resident said: "If I
    (...)  significance to the local Anangu traditional owners. The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it reverted
    1  ) People are now banned from climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous Australian
    (...)  officially off-limits to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in recognition of the site's cultural
    (...)  site in Anangu culture. The Anangu custodians of the rock have long campaigned for the ban.
    (...)  tried to climb on top of that parliament house at Canberra, they wouldn't let me in."
    (...)  sacred place. That's like our church. I've been telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to
    (...)  association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew
    (...)  culture. The world's largest monolith, the giant Uluru in the desert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now
    (...)  to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major attraction for decades. Tourists from
    (...)  The ban was initially announced in 2017 and most visitors complied with it. Australia's tourist
    (...)  up in a tiny community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a very

    Put the words in the right order

    1. sites   .   sacred   Climbing   the   one   of   most
    2. site's   recognition   the   cultural   of   significance   .   In
    3. for   been   major   has   a   It   attraction   decades   .
    4. flocked   from   the   there   .   have   world   Tourists   around
    5. have   for   campaigned   the   Custodians   ban   .   long
    6. since   the   climbed   have   2017   .   actually   Visitors   rock
    7. up   Uluru   .   in   community   near   a   Grew   tiny
    8. since   boy   .   was   little   I   Telling   a   them
    9. rock   .   of   stories   are   our   the   on   All
    10. parliament   top   house   .   of   on   that   Climb

    Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

    People are now banned / binned from climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous Australian cultural / culture. The world's largest goliath / monolith, the giant Uluru in the desert / dessert of Australia's Northern Territory, is now officially off-limits to tourists and climbers. It will be closed from October 25 in recognition / recognize of the site's cultural significance to the local Anangu traditional owns / owners. The giant site was once known as Ayers Rock, before it retorted / reverted to its historic name of Uluru. It has been a major attraction for decadence / decades. Tourists from around the world have flocked there in droves / drives to climb the rock. However, it is a sacred site in Anangu culture. The Anangu custodians of the rock have wide / long campaigned for the ban.

    The ban was initially / initial announced in 2017 and most visitors compiled / complied with it. Australia's tourist associate / association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually clambered / climbed the rock since 2017. Local Anangu man Rameth Thomas, who grew up in a tinny / tiny community near Uluru, explained to the BBC how important / importance the rock is to his people. He said: "That place is a very sacred place. That's like our church. I've been speaking / telling them since I was a little boy: 'We don't want you to climb the rock.'" He added: "All of our stories / stores are on the rock. People right around the world come just to climb it. They've got no respective / respect." Another resident said: "If I tried to climb on top of that parliament house at Canberra, they wouldn't reach / let me in."

    Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

    Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

    P__ p l_ _r_ n_w b_n n_d f r_m c l_m b_n g _n_ _f t h_ m_s t s_c r_d s_t_s _n _n d_g_n__ s A_s t r_l__ n c_l t_r_. T h_ w_r l d ' s l_r g_s t m_n_l_t h , t h_ g__ n t U l_r_ _n t h_ d_s_r t _f A_s t r_l__ ' s N_r t h_r n T_r r_t_r y , _s n_w _f f_c__ l l y _f f - l_m_t s t_ t__ r_s t s _n d c l_m b_r s . I t w_l l b_ c l_s_d f r_m O c t_b_r 2 5 _n r_c_g n_t__ n _f t h_ s_t_' s c_l t_r_l s_g n_f_c_n c_ t_ t h_ l_c_l A n_n g_ t r_d_t__ n_l _w n_r s . T h_ g__ n t s_t_ w_s _n c_ k n_w n _s A y_r s R_c k , b_f_r_ _t r_v_r t_d t_ _t s h_s t_r_c n_m_ _f U l_r_. I t h_s b__ n _ m_j_r _t t r_c t__ n f_r d_c_d_s . T__ r_s t s f r_m _r__ n d t h_ w_r l d h_v_ f l_c k_d t h_r_ _n d r_v_s t_ c l_m b t h_ r_c k . H_w_v_r , _t _s _ s_c r_d s_t_ _n A n_n g_ c_l t_r_. T h_ A n_n g_ c_s t_d__ n s _f t h_ r_c k h_v_ l_n g c_m p__ g n_d f_r t h_ b_n .

    T h_ b_n w_s _n_t__ l l y _n n__ n c_d _n 2 0 1 7 _n d m_s t v_s_t_r s c_m p l__ d w_t h _t . A_s t r_l__ ' s t__ r_s t _s s_c__ t__ n s__ d t h_t _n l y 1 6 p_r c_n t _f v_s_t_r s h_v_ _c t__ l l y c l_m b_d t h_ r_c k s_n c_ 2 0 1 7 . L_c_l A n_n g_ m_n R_m_t h T h_m_s , w h_ g r_w _p _n _ t_n y c_m m_n_t y n__ r U l_r_, _x p l__ n_d t_ t h_ B B C h_w _m p_r t_n t t h_ r_c k _s t_ h_s p__ p l_. H_ s__ d : " T h_t p l_c_ _s _ v_r y s_c r_d p l_c_. T h_t ' s l_k_ __ r c h_r c h . I ' v_ b__ n t_l l_n g t h_m s_n c_ I w_s _ l_t t l_ b_y : ' W_ d_n ' t w_n t y__ t_ c l_m b t h_ r_c k . ' " H_ _d d_d : " A l l _f __ r s t_r__ s _r_ _n t h_ r_c k . P__ p l_ r_g h t _r__ n d t h_ w_r l d c_m_ j_s t t_ c l_m b _t . T h_y ' v_ g_t n_ r_s p_c t . " A n_t h_r r_s_d_n t s__ d : " I f I t r__ d t_ c l_m b _n t_p _f t h_t p_r l__ m_n t h__ s_ _t C_n b_r r_, t h_y w__ l d n ' t l_t m_ _n . "

    Punctuate the text and add capitals

    people are now banned from climbing one of the most sacred sites in indigenous australian culture the worlds largest monolith the giant uluru in the desert of australias northern territory is now officially offlimits to tourists and climbers it will be closed from october 25 in recognition of the sites cultural significance to the local anangu traditional owners the giant site was once known as ayers rock before it reverted to its historic name of uluru it has been a major attraction for decades tourists from around the world have flocked there in droves to climb the rock however it is a sacred site in anangu culture the anangu custodians of the rock have long campaigned for the ban

    the ban was initially announced in 2017 and most visitors complied with it australias tourist association said that only 16 per cent of visitors have actually climbed the rock since 2017 local anangu man rameth thomas who grew up in a tiny community near uluru explained to the bbc how important the rock is to his people he said that place is a very sacred place thats like our church ive been telling them since i was a little boy we dont want you to climb the rock he added all of our stories are on the rock people right around the world come just to climb it theyve got no respect another resident said if i tried to climb on top of that parliament house at canberra they wouldnt let me in"

    Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

    Peoplearenowbannedfromclimbingoneofthemostsacredsitesinindig
    enousAustralianculture.Theworld'slargestmonolith,thegiantUluruin
    thedesertofAustralia'sNorthernTerritory,isnowofficiallyoff-limitstot
    ouristsandclimbers.ItwillbeclosedfromOctober25inrecognitionofthe
    site'sculturalsignificancetothelocalAnangutraditionalowners.Thegia
    ntsitewasonceknownasAyersRock,beforeitrevertedtoitshistoricnam
    eofUluru.Ithasbeenamajorattractionfordecades.Touristsfromaroun
    dtheworldhaveflockedthereindrovestoclimbtherock.However,itisas
    acredsiteinAnanguculture.TheAnangucustodiansoftherockhavelong
    campaignedfortheban.Thebanwasinitiallyannouncedin2017andmos
    tvisitorscompliedwithit.Australia'stouristassociationsaidthatonly16
    percentofvisitorshaveactuallyclimbedtherocksince2017.LocalAnan
    gumanRamethThomas,whogrewupinatinycommunitynearUluru,ex
    plainedtotheBBChowimportanttherockistohispeople.Hesaid:"Thatpl
    aceisaverysacredplace.That'slikeourchurch.I'vebeentellingthemsin
    ceIwasalittleboy:'Wedon'twantyoutoclimbtherock.'"Headded:"Allof
    ourstoriesareontherock.Peoplerightaroundtheworldcomejusttoclim
    bit.They'vegotnorespect."Anotherresidentsaid:"IfItriedtoclimbonto
    pofthatparliamenthouseatCanberra,theywouldn'tletmein."

    Free writing

    Write about Uluru for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

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    Academic writing

    All tourism should be reduced to limit the impact on local cultures. Discuss.

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    Homework

    1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.
    2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about this news story. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.
    3. ULURU: Make a poster about Uluru. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?
    4. TOURISM: Write a magazine article about reducing tourism to protect cultures. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.
    Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).
    5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.
    6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on Uluru. Ask him/her three questions about it. Give him/her three of your opinions on the climbing ban. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

    Answers

    (Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

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