The Reading / Listening - Brainwaves - Level 6

Scientists may soon be able to interpret what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as they speak. This revolutionary advance in neuroscience would help millions of people who suffer from communication problems and neurological disorders. The scientists developed a form of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them into text. Algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates it in real time into sentences on a screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their algorithms have a 97 per cent translation accuracy rate but are working hard to improve on this.



The scientists say they are at the early stages of being able to machine-translate everything someone says. The software used in their experiments matched features of speech that were repeated frequently to parts and shapes of the mouth. These included elements of English speech such as vowels, consonants and commands. The experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-constructed spoken sentences. The scientists said: "Although we should like the decoder to learn and exploit the regularities of the language, it remains to show how many data would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more general form of English."

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

    Brainwaves - Level 4  or  Brainwaves - Level 5

Sources
  • https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-52094111
  • https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/mar/30/scientists-develop-ai-that-can-turn-brain-activity-into-text
  • https://www.inverse.com/innovation/brain-to-text


Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)



Warm-ups

1. BRAINWAVES: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about brainwaves. Change partners often and share your findings.
2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?
       scientists / interpret / brainwaves / speak / communication / intelligence / translation
       early stages / software / experiments / mouth / vowels / language / data / English
Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.
3. NO LANGUAGE LEARNING: Students A strongly believe we will not need to learn languages in the future; Students B strongly believe we will.  Change partners again and talk about your conversations.
4. ENGLISH: What problems do you have with these aspects of English? What are the solutions? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.

 

Problems

Solutions

Grammar

 

 

Pronunciation

 

 

Vocabulary

 

 

Speaking

 

 

Punctuation

 

 

Writing

 

 

MY e-BOOK
ESL resource book with copiable worksheets and handouts - 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers / English teachers
See a sample

5. INTELLIGENCE: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "intelligence". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.
6. LANGUAGE: Rank these with your partner. Put the most important things to learn at the top at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • vocabulary
  • spelling
  • grammar
  • syllables
  • punctuation
  • writing sentences
  • slang
  • intonation

 

Vocabulary

    Paragraph 1

      1. interpret a. A development or improvement.
      2. advance b. Convert a scrambled message into understandable language.
      3. neuroscience c. A disease or abnormal physical or mental condition.
      4. disorder d. The studies that deal with the structure or function of the nervous system and brain.
      5. decode e. Translate the words of a person speaking a different language.
      6. algorithms f. The quality or state of being correct or precise.
      7. accuracy g. A process or set of rules to be followed in calculations or other problem-solving operations.

    Paragraph 2

      8. feature h. Make full use of and get benefit from.
      9. frequently i. A distinctive quality, characteristic or aspect of something.
      10. element j. A basic sound in speech made by the lips or tongue blocking the breath.
      11. vowel k. Things that are constant or the same.
      12. consonant l. A part (often essential) of something.
      13. exploit m. A letter representing a sound, such as a, e, i, o, u.
      14. regularities n. Regularly or habitually; often.

 

Before reading / listening

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if 1-8 below are true (T) or false (F).

  1. Scientists can translate what someone is saying in different languages.    T / F
  2. New technology would help people with neurological problems.     T / F
  3. Algorithms could translate brainwaves into written text.     T / F
  4. Scientists say the algorithms are 97% accurate.     T / F
  5. Scientists are nearing the end of their testing.     T / F
  6. Software matched features of speech to the shape of a mouth.     T / F
  7. Scientists analysed over 40 thousand short sentences.     T / F
  8. Scientists said they needed to reduce the data they have.     T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

  1. simply
  2. revolutionary
  3. disorders
  4. translates
  5. accuracy
  6. stages
  7. matched
  8. elements
  9. exploit
  10. expand
  1. components
  2. precision
  3. utilize
  4. illnesses
  5. cutting-edge
  6. corresponded
  7. phases
  8. just
  9. broaden
  10. converts

3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

  1. analysing their brainwaves
  2. communication problems and
  3. translates it in real
  4. algorithms have a 97 per cent translation
  5. working hard to improve
  6. scientists say they are at
  7. features of speech that were repeated
  8. elements of English speech such as
  9. 40 short and simply-constructed
  10. a more general
  1. accuracy rate
  2. frequently
  3. spoken sentences
  4. neurological disorders
  5. the early stages
  6. as they speak
  7. form of English
  8. on this
  9. vowels
  10. time

Gap fill

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
advance
text
rate
interpret
disorders
algorithms
real
suffer

Scientists may soon be able to (1) ____________ what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as they speak. This revolutionary (2) ____________ in neuroscience would help millions of people who (3) ____________ from communication problems and neurological (4) ____________. The scientists developed a form of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them into (5) ____________. Algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates it in (6) ____________ time into sentences on a screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their (7) ____________ have a 97 per cent translation accuracy (8) ____________ but are working hard to improve on this.

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
exploit
matched
consonants
stages
data
sentences
form
shapes

The scientists say they are at the early (9) ____________ of being able to machine-translate everything someone says. The software used in their experiments (10) ____________ features of speech that were repeated frequently to parts and (11) ____________ of the mouth. These included elements of English speech such as vowels, (12) ____________ and commands. The experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-constructed spoken (13) ____________. The scientists said: "Although we should like the decoder to learn and (14) ____________ the regularities of the language, it remains to show how many (15) ____________ would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more general (16) ____________ of English."

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1)  simply by analysing their brainwaves ______
     a.  as they speaking
     b.  as they spoken
     c.  as they speak
     d.  as they speech
2)  people who suffer from communication problems and ______
     a.  new illogical disorders
     b.  newer logical disorders
     c.  neurological disorders
     d.  new logical disorders
3)  a form of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate ______
     a.  them unto text
     b.  them into text
     c.  them as to text
     d.  them in two texts
4)  a person speaks and translates it in real time into sentences ______
     a.  on a screen
     b.  on a scree
     c.  on a screed
     d.  on a scream
5)  They say their algorithms have a 97 per cent translation ______
     a.  accurate sea rate
     b.  accuracy rated
     c.  accuracies ratio
     d.  accuracy rate

6)  The software used in their experiments matched ______
     a.  features of speech
     b.  featured of speak
     c.  featureless of speech
     d.  features of speak
7)  These included elements of English speech such as vowels, consonants ______
     a.  and commends
     b.  and comma ends
     c.  and commanders
     d.  and commands
8) experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-______ sentences
     a.  construct it spoken
     b.  constructed speaking
     c.  construct it speaking
     d.  constructed spoken
9) the regularities of the language, it remains to show how many ______ required
     a.  data would been
     b.  datum would be
     c.  dates would be
     d.  data would be
10)  be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more ______ English
     a.  generals form of
     b.  generally firm of
     c.  general form off
     d.  general form of

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

Scientists may soon be (1) ___________________ what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as they speak. This revolutionary advance in neuroscience would help millions of (2) ___________________ from communication problems and neurological disorders. The scientists developed a (3) ___________________ intelligence that can decode brainwaves and (4) ___________________ text. Algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates it in real time (5) ___________________ a screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their algorithms have a 97 per cent translation (6) ___________________ are working hard to improve on this.

The scientists say they are at the (7) ___________________ being able to machine-translate everything someone says. The software used in their experiments (8) ___________________ speech that were repeated frequently to parts and shapes of the mouth. These included elements of English speech (9) ___________________, consonants and commands. The experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-constructed spoken sentences. The scientists said: "Although we should (10) ___________________ to learn and exploit the regularities of the language, it remains to show how many data would be (11) ___________________ from our tiny languages to a more (12) ___________________ English."

Comprehension questions

  1. Who may be able to interpret what someone is saying?
  2. What kind of disorders might the software help?
  3. What translates brain activity as a person speaks?
  4. When does the software translate brainwaves?
  5. What is the accuracy rate of the scientists' algorithms?
  6. What stage are the scientists at in the testing?
  7. What was matched to parts and shapes of the mouth?
  8. How many short sentences were used in the experiments?
  9. What do scientists want to exploit regularities of language?
  10. What must scientists expand to get to a more general from of English?




Multiple choice quiz

1)  Who may be able to interpret what someone is saying?
a) interpreters
b) scientists
c) translators
d) people with brainwaves
2) What kind of disorders might the software help?
a) software disorders
b) major disorders
c) software disorders
d) neurological disorders
3) What translates brain activity as a person speaks?
a) Google translate
b) a mobile phone
c) algorithms
d) a website
4) When does the software translate brainwaves?
a) in real time
b) 10 minutes after a person speaks
c) next year
d) in 2021

5) What is the accuracy rate of the scientists' algorithms?
a) 3%
b) 97%
c) 50%
d) 40%

6) What stage are the scientists at in the testing?
a) the early stages
b) stage two
c) the final stage
d) stage 17
7) What was matched to parts and shapes of the mouth?
a) a grammar book
b) identity software
c) features of speech
d) people
8) How many short sentences were used in the experiments?
a) 40
b) 36
c) 30
d) 24
9) What do scientists want to use to exploit regularities of language?
a) other languages
b) people's ability to learn
c) grammar books
d) their decoder
10) What must scientists expand to get to a more general from of English?
a) brain power
b) vocabularies
c) data
d) muscles

Role play

Role  A – Vocabulary
You think vocabulary is the most important part of learning a language. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the least important of these (and why): spelling, punctuation or grammar.

Role  B – Spelling
You think spelling is the most important part of learning a language. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the least important of these (and why): vocabulary, punctuation or grammar.

Role  C – Punctuation
You think punctuation is the most important part of learning a language. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the least important of these (and why): spelling, vocabulary or grammar.

Role  D – Grammar
You think grammar is the most important part of learning a language. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the least important of these (and why): spelling, punctuation or vocabulary.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'brain'

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • and 'wave'.

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • • Share your findings with your partners.

    • Make questions using the words you found.

    • Ask your partner / group your questions.

    2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

    •Share your questions with other classmates / groups. •Ask your partner / group your questions.

    3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

    4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

    5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

    • soon
    • millions
    • developed
    • created
    • from
    • improve
    • early
    • software
    • elements
    • 40
    • remains
    • general




    Student survey

    Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

    (Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

    Discussion - Brainwaves

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    1. What did you think when you read the headline?
    2. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'brain'?
    3. When was the last time you had a brainwave?
    4. What do you know about brainwaves?
    5. What do you know about neuroscience?
    6. How can we help people with communication problems?
    7. What communication problems have you had?
    8. What do you know about artificial intelligence?
    9. How good are you at translating English into your language?
    10. How important is accuracy when speaking English?

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    1. Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
    2. What do you think of when you hear the word 'wave'?
    3. What do you think about what you read?
    4. What do you think is the future of this technology?
    5. Would you like software that instantly translates brainwaves?
    6. Would you learn English if there was real-time translation software?
    7. What is most difficult when speaking English?
    8. Do you think we will need English teachers in the future?
    9. In what other ways could translating brainwaves help us?
    10. What questions would you like to ask the researchers?

    Discussion — Write your own questions

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    (a) ________________

    (b) ________________

    (c) ________________

    (d) ________________

    (e) ________________

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    (f) ________________

    (g) ________________

    (h) ________________

    (i) ________________

    (j) ________________





    Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

    Scientists may soon be able to interpret what someone is saying (1) ____ by analysing their brainwaves as they speak. This revolutionary advance (2) ____ neuroscience would help millions of people who suffer from communication problems and neurological disorders. The scientists developed a (3) ____ of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them (4) ____ text. Algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates it in real (5) ____ into sentences on a screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their algorithms have a 97 per cent translation accuracy rate but are working hard to improve (6) ____ this.

    The scientists say they are at the early stages of (7) ____ able to machine-translate everything someone says. The software used in their experiments matched features of speech that were repeated (8) ____ to parts and shapes of the mouth. These included elements of English speech such (9) ____ vowels, consonants and commands. The experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-(10) ____ spoken sentences. The scientists said: "Although we should like the decoder to learn and exploit the regularities of the language, it (11) ____ to show how many data would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a (12) ____ general form of English."

    Which of these words go in the above text?

    1. (a)     simple     (b)     sample     (c)     simply     (d)     samples    
    2. (a)     in     (b)     at     (c)     by     (d)     as    
    3. (a)     form     (b)     firm     (c)     frame     (d)     farm    
    4. (a)     into     (b)     unto     (c)     onto     (d)     as to    
    5. (a)     tome     (b)     time     (c)     tame     (d)     tum    
    6. (a)     of     (b)     as     (c)     to     (d)     on    
    7. (a)     been     (b)     be     (c)     being     (d)     begin    
    8. (a)     frequented     (b)     frequency     (c)     frequent     (d)     frequently    
    9. (a)     as     (b)     has     (c)     is     (d)     was    
    10. (a)     restructured     (b)     constructed     (c)     constricted     (d)     contrasted    
    11. (a)     stays     (b)     remains     (c)     waits     (d)     keeps    
    12. (a)     many     (b)     much     (c)     more     (d)     mare

    Spelling

    Paragraph 1

    1. tiprernet what someone is saying
    2. revolutionary advance in unosiceercne
    3. problems and neurological ioddrsers
    4. loatirhgms take the brain activity
    5. nsnetcees on a screen
    6. translation ucarccay rate

    Paragraph 2

    1. matched etfruaes of speech
    2. repeated rqfneutely
    3. vowels, oscanonnts and commands
    4. simply ontccurtsed
    5. xlpeoit the regularities of the language
    6. be qruireed to expand

    Put the text back together

    (...)  The scientists say they are at the early stages of being able to machine-translate everything someone
    (...)  of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them into text. Algorithms take the brain
    (...)  consonants and commands. The experiments were limited to around 40 short and simply-constructed
    (...)  algorithms have a 97 per cent translation accuracy rate but are working hard to improve on this.
    1  ) Scientists may soon be able to interpret what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as
    (...)  spoken sentences. The scientists said: "Although we should like the decoder to
    (...)  learn and exploit the regularities of the language, it remains to show how many data
    (...)  they speak. This revolutionary advance in neuroscience would help millions of people who
    (...)  says. The software used in their experiments matched features of speech that were repeated
    (...)  would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more general form of English."
    (...)  activity created as a person speaks and translates it in real time into sentences on a
    (...)  screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their
    (...)  frequently to parts and shapes of the mouth. These included elements of English speech such as vowels,
    (...)  suffer from communication problems and neurological disorders. The scientists developed a form

    Put the words in the right order

    1. interpret   able   someone   is   to   Be   what   saying   .
    2. from   Millions   people   communication   who   of   suffer   problems   .
    3. artificial   form   scientists   a   intelligence   .   developed   The   of
    4. real   Algorithms   it   translate   time   into   sentences   .   in
    5. 97%   rate   .   algorithms   translation   Their   have   a   accuracy
    6. at   Scientists   say   they   are   the   stages   .   early
    7. of   were   that   frequently   .   Matched   repeated   speech   features
    8. English   Elements   speech   of   as   vowels   .   such
    9. short   Around   spoken   40   simply-constructed   and   sentences   .
    10. how   many   would   Show   be   data   required   .

    Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

    Scientists may soon be able to interpreter / interpret what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as they spoken / speak. This revolutionary advance in neuroscience would help millions of people who suffer from / of communication problems and neurological orders / disorders. The scientists developed a firm / form of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them / it into text. Algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates them / it in real time into sentences on the / a screen. The scientists are from the University of California, San Francisco. They say their / them algorithms have a 97 per cent translation accuracy rate but are working hard to improve of / on this.

    The scientists say they are at the fast / early stages of being able to machine-translate everything / thing someone says. The software used in / on their experiments matched features of speak / speech that were repeated frequently to parts and shapes of the mouthed / mouth. These included elements of English speech such was / as vowels, consonants and commands. The experiments were limited / limits to around 40 short and simply-constructed spoken sentences. The scientists said: "Although we should like the decoder to learn and exploit / expedite the regularities of the language, it remains / remaining to show how many data would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more general / generally form of English."

    Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

    Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

    S c__ n t_s t s m_y s__ n b_ _b l_ t_ _n t_r p r_t w h_t s_m__ n_ _s s_y_n g s_m p l y b y _n_l y s_n g t h__ r b r__ n w_v_s _s t h_y s p__ k . T h_s r_v_l_t__ n_r y _d v_n c_ _n n__ r_s c__ n c_ w__ l d h_l p m_l l__ n s _f p__ p l_ w h_ s_f f_r f r_m c_m m_n_c_t__ n p r_b l_m s _n d n__ r_l_g_c_l d_s_r d_r s . T h_ s c__ n t_s t s d_v_l_p_d _ f_r m _f _r t_f_c__ l _n t_l l_g_n c_ t h_t c_n d_c_d_ b r__ n w_v_s _n d t r_n s l_t_ t h_m _n t_ t_x t . A l g_r_t h m s t_k_ t h_ b r__ n _c t_v_t y c r__ t_d _s _ p_r s_n s p__ k s _n d t r_n s l_t_s _t _n r__ l t_m_ _n t_ s_n t_n c_s _n _ s c r__ n . T h_ s c__ n t_s t s _r_ f r_m t h_ U n_v_r s_t y _f C_l_f_r n__ , S_n F r_n c_s c_. T h_y s_y t h__ r _l g_r_t h m s h_v_ _ 9 7 p_r c_n t t r_n s l_t__ n _c c_r_c y r_t_ b_t _r_ w_r k_n g h_r d t_ _m p r_v_ _n t h_s .

    T h_ s c__ n t_s t s s_y t h_y _r_ _t t h_ __ r l y s t_g_s _f b__ n g _b l_ t_ m_c h_n_- t r_n s l_t_ _v_r y t h_n g s_m__ n_ s_y s . T h_ s_f t w_r_ _s_d _n t h__ r _x p_r_m_n t s m_t c h_d f__ t_r_s _f s p__ c h t h_t w_r_ r_p__ t_d f r_q__ n t l y t_ p_r t s _n d s h_p_s _f t h_ m__ t h . T h_s_ _n c l_d_d _l_m_n t s _f E n g l_s h s p__ c h s_c h _s v_w_l s , c_n s_n_n t s _n d c_m m_n d s . T h_ _x p_r_m_n t s w_r_ l_m_t_d t_ _r__ n d 4 0 s h_r t _n d s_m p l y - c_n s t r_c t_d s p_k_n s_n t_n c_s . T h_ s c__ n t_s t s s__ d : " A l t h__ g h w_ s h__ l d l_k_ t h_ d_c_d_r t_ l__ r n _n d _x p l__ t t h_ r_g_l_r_t__ s _f t h_ l_n g__ g_, _t r_m__ n s t_ s h_w h_w m_n y d_t_ w__ l d b_ r_q__ r_d t_ _x p_n d f r_m __ r t_n y l_n g__ g_s t_ _ m_r_ g_n_r_l f_r m _f E n g l_s h . "

    Punctuate the text and add capitals

    scientists may soon be able to interpret what someone is saying simply by analysing their brainwaves as they speak this revolutionary advance in neuroscience would help millions of people who suffer from communication problems and neurological disorders the scientists developed a form of artificial intelligence that can decode brainwaves and translate them into text algorithms take the brain activity created as a person speaks and translates it in real time into sentences on a screen the scientists are from the university of california san francisco they say their algorithms have a 97 per cent translation accuracy rate but are working hard to improve on this

    the scientists say they are at the early stages of being able to machinetranslate everything someone says the software used in their experiments matched features of speech that were repeated frequently to parts and shapes of the mouth these included elements of english speech such as vowels consonants and commands the experiments were limited to around 40 short and simplyconstructed spoken sentences the scientists said although we should like the decoder to learn and exploit the regularities of the language it remains to show how many data would be required to expand from our tiny languages to a more general form of english

    Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

    Scientistsmaysoonbeabletointerpretwhatsomeoneissayingsimplyb
    yanalysingtheirbrainwavesastheyspeak.Thisrevolutionaryadvancei
    nneurosciencewouldhelpmillionsofpeoplewhosufferfromcommunica
    tionproblemsandneurologicaldisorders.Thescientistsdevelopedafor
    mofartificialintelligencethatcandecodebrainwavesandtranslatethe
    mintotext.Algorithmstakethebrainactivitycreatedasapersonspeaks
    andtranslatesitinrealtimeintosentencesonascreen.Thescientistsaref
    romtheUniversityofCalifornia,SanFrancisco.Theysaytheiralgorithm
    shavea97percenttranslationaccuracyratebutareworkinghardtoimpr
    oveonthis.Thescientistssaytheyareattheearlystagesofbeingabletom
    achine-translateeverythingsomeonesays.Thesoftwareusedintheire
    xperimentsmatchedfeaturesofspeechthatwererepeatedfrequentlyt
    opartsandshapesofthemouth.TheseincludedelementsofEnglishspee
    chsuchasvowels,consonantsandcommands.Theexperimentswereli
    mitedtoaround40shortandsimply-constructedspokensentences.T
    hescientistssaid:"Althoughweshouldlikethedecodertolearnandexplo
    ittheregularitiesofthelanguage,itremainstoshowhowmanydatawoul
    dberequiredtoexpandfromourtinylanguagestoamoregeneralformof
    English."

    Free writing

    Write about brainwaves for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

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    Academic writing

    A technology that means we don't need to learn new languages is great. Discuss.

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    Homework

    1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.
    2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about this news story. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.
    3. BRAINWAVES: Make a poster about brainwaves. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?
    4. NO LESSONS: Write a magazine article about language lessons being ended because of being able to translate brainwaves. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.
    Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).
    5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.
    6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on brainwaves. Ask him/her three questions about them. Give him/her three of your ideas on what we can use the brainwave-reading technology for. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

    Answers

    (Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

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