The Reading / Listening - Gender-neutral Language - Level 6

Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested to avoid the use of certain words related to gender. ANU's Gender Institute issued a list of replacement terms for everyday words like 'mother' and 'father'. The switch in vocabulary is part of an initiative to encourage more gender-neutral language. Staff are being asked to use the term 'gestational parent' instead of 'mother,' and 'non-birthing parent' in place of 'father'. The institute's gender handbook claims the words 'mother' and 'father' exclude non-binary people. These are people who identify as being neither male nor female. Non-binary people feel unrepresented in society because of words that refer to males and females.



The gender handbook explains the suggested nomenclature guidelines. It says: "While many students will identify as 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms alone to describe parenthood excludes those who do not identify with gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is particularly important in...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was just a guide. It said: "This document is not an official ANU policy....It is a guide developed by expert researchers to assist anyone committed to enhancing inclusiveness and diversity." Last week, a UK university asked its staff to substitute the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

    Gender-neutral Language - Level 4  or  Gender-neutral Language - Level 5

Sources
  • https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/university-staff-told-stop-saying-23507643
  • https://au.news.yahoo.com/university-asks-staff-to-refer-to-it-as-chest-feeding-100937936.html
  • https://www.foxnews.com/world/university-handbook-encourages-staff-to-adopt-gender-neutral-language


Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)



Warm-ups

1. GENDER-NEUTRAL LANGUAGE: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about gender-neutral language. Change partners often and share your findings.
2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?
       staff / gender / list / replacement / vocabulary / gender-neutral / language / society /
       handbook / guidelines / parenthood / important / document / policy / diversity / word
Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.
3. VOCABULARY: Students A strongly believe vocabulary should never change; Students B strongly believe it should. Change partners again and talk about your conversations.
4. LANGUAGE: How does English compare with your language? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.

 

English

My Language

Gender-neutrality

 

 

Bad language

 

 

Grammar

 

 

Pronunciation

 

 

Polite language

 

 

Spelling

 

 

MY e-BOOK
ESL resource book with copiable worksheets and handouts - 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers / English teachers
See a sample

5. GENDER: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "gender". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.
6. ENGLISH: Rank these with your partner. Put the most useful things to learn about English at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • Gender-neutrality
  • Slang
  • Bad language
  • Poetry
  • Spelling
  • Text messaging
  • Polite language
  • Hip-hop

 

Vocabulary

    Paragraph 1

      1. avoid a. A word or phrase used to describe a thing or to express a concept.
      2. replacement b. Related to the process of carrying or being carried in the womb between conception and birth.
      3. initiative c. Keep away from or stop oneself from doing something.
      4. term d. Not relating to, composed of, or involving just two things.
      5. gestational e. The action or process of changing someone or something with another person or thing.
      6. birthing f. An act or strategy intended to resolve a difficulty or improve a situation.
      7. non-binary g. The action or process of giving birth.

    Paragraph 2

      8. nomenclature h. A person or thing acting or serving in place of another.
      9. excludes i. The word or words applied to someone or something.
      10. identify j. Denies someone access to or stop someone from going to or being at a place, group, or somewhere in society.
      11. committed k. Intensifying, increasing, or further improving the quality, value, or extent of.
      12. enhancing l. Wholeheartedly dedicated.
      13. inclusiveness m. Establish or show who or what someone or something is.
      14. substitute n. The quality of including all sections of society.

 

Before reading / listening

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if 1-8 below are true (T) or false (F).

  1. Staff at a university in Australia can no longer use gender-related words. T / F
  2. A gender institute wants people to say 'mum' and not 'mother'.     T / F
  3. The institute wants staff to say 'non-birthing parent' instead of 'father'.   T / F
  4. The institute says gender words make non-binary people feel excluded.   T / F
  5. The institute said students do not identify as mothers or fathers.     T / F
  6. A spokesperson said gender-related language was now university policy. T / F
  7. The institute's guide is to help people enhance diversity.     T / F
  8. A UK university wants to introduce a new word - 'chestfeeding'.    T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

  1. avoid
  2. certain
  3. switch
  4. term
  5. claim
  6. handbook
  7. describe
  8. particularly
  9. assist
  10. diversity
  1. illustrate
  2. word
  3. manual
  4. change
  5. variety
  6. shun
  7. help
  8. assert
  9. particular
  10. especially

3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

  1. avoid the use of
  2. replacement terms
  3. part of an initiative to
  4. Non-binary people feel unrepresented
  5. words that refer
  6. The gender
  7. particularly important in discussions
  8. It is a guide developed
  9. enhancing inclusiveness
  10. a UK university asked its staff
  1. handbook
  2. to substitute the word
  3. certain words
  4. and diversity
  5. in society
  6. encourage more
  7. by expert researchers
  8. to males and females
  9. of childbirth
  10. for everyday words

Gap fill

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
switch
place
refer
list
avoid
neither
encourage
claims

Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested to  (1) _____________________ the use of certain words related to gender. ANU's Gender Institute issued a                                           (2) _____________________ of replacement terms for everyday words like 'mother' and 'father'. The  (3) _____________________ in vocabulary is part of an initiative to  (4) _____________________ more gender-neutral language. Staff are being asked to use the term 'gestational parent' instead of 'mother,' and 'non-birthing parent' in  (5) _____________________ of 'father'. The institute's gender handbook  (6) _____________________ the words 'mother' and 'father' exclude non-binary people. These are people who identify as being  (7) _____________________ male nor female. Non-binary people feel unrepresented in society because of words that                              (8) _____________________ to males and females.

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
guide
suggested
diversity
identify
expert
substitute
alone
particularly

The gender handbook explains the  (9) _____________________ nomenclature guidelines. It says: "While many students will identify as 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms                                       (10) _____________________ to describe parenthood excludes those who do not  (11) _____________________ with gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is  (12) _____________________ important in...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was just a                                 (13) _____________________. It said: "This document is not an official ANU policy....It is a guide developed by  (14) _____________________ researchers to assist anyone committed to enhancing inclusiveness and  (15) _____________________." Last week, a UK university asked its staff to  (16) _____________________ the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1)  requested to avoid the use of certain words ______
     a.  related to agenda
     b.  related to gender
     c.  related to gander
     d.  related to a gander
2)  ANU's Gender Institute issued a list of replacement ______ words
     a.  term for everyday
     b.  teams for everyday
     c.  terms for everyday
     d.  trams for everyday
3)  The switch in vocabulary is part ______
     a.  of an initiation
     b.  of an initial tiff
     c.  of an initiative
     d.  of an in iterate
4) handbook claims the words 'mother' and 'father' exclude ______
     a.  non-binary people
     b.  not-binary people
     c.  now-binary people
     d.  new-binary people
5)  Non-binary people feel unrepresented in society because of words that ______
     a.  defer to males
     b.  infer to males
     c.  offer to males
     d.  refer to males

6)  It says: "While many students will ______
     a.  identity as 'mothers'
     b.  indemnify as 'mothers'
     c.  identify as 'mothers'
     d.  indent a fly as 'mothers'
7)  It says: "While many students will identify as 'mothers' or 'fathers,' ______"
     a.  using them terms
     b.  using these terms
     c.  using thesis terms
     d.  using theses terms
8)  An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was ______
     a.  adjust a guide
     b.  just tag I'd
     c.  adjuster guide
     d.  just a guide
9)  It is a guide developed by expert researchers ______
     a.  to as cyst anyone
     b.  to a cyst anyone
     c.  to as cyst anyone
     d.  to assist anyone
10)  Last week, a UK university asked its staff to ______
     a.  substituted the word
     b.  substituted the word
     c.  substitute the word
     d.  substitution the word

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested to (1) ____________________ of certain words related to gender. ANU's Gender Institute (2) ____________________ of replacement terms for everyday words like 'mother' and 'father'. The (3) ____________________ is part of an initiative to encourage more gender-neutral language. Staff are being asked to (4) ____________________ 'gestational parent' instead of 'mother,' and 'non-birthing parent' (5) ____________________ 'father'. The institute's gender handbook claims the words 'mother' and 'father' exclude non-binary people. These are people who identify as being neither male nor female. Non-binary people feel unrepresented in society because of words (6) ____________________ males and females.

The gender handbook explains the suggested nomenclature guidelines. It says: "While many students (7) ____________________ 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms alone to describe parenthood excludes those who do (8) ____________________ gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is particularly important in...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was                           (9) ____________________. It said: "This document is not an official ANU policy....It is a guide (10) ____________________ researchers to assist anyone (11) ____________________ inclusiveness and diversity." Last week, a UK university asked its (12) ____________________ the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.

Comprehension questions

  1. In what city is the university in the article?
  2. What is the name of the university institution that issued guidelines?
  3. What term is being recommended in place of 'mother'?
  4. What term is being recommended in place of 'father'?
  5. Who does the article say may feel unrepresented?
  6. What does a handbook say students may identify as?
  7. What does the handbook say non-gendered language is important in?
  8. What did an ANU spokesperson say the handbook was?
  9. Who was the guide developed by?
  10. What does a UK university want staff to use instead of 'breastfeeding'?




Multiple choice quiz

1)  In what city is the university in the article?
a) Melbourne
b) Canberra
c) Brisbane
d) Sydney
2) What is the name of the university institution that issued guidelines?
a) the Language Centre
b) ANU Gender
c) the Binary Department
d) the Gender Institute
3) What term is being recommended in place of 'mother'?
a) ma
b) Alice
c) gestational parent
d) Y
4) What term is being recommended in place of 'father'?
a) non-birthing parent
b) X
c) Bob
d) pa
5) Who does the article say may feel unrepresented?
a) parents
b) non-binary people
c) binary people
d) children

6) What does a handbook say students may identify as?
a) mothers or fathers
b) either
c) children
d) people
7) What does the handbook say non-gendered language is important in?
a) universities
b) maternity clinics
c) discussions of childbirth and parenthood
d) families
8) What did an ANU spokesperson say the handbook was?
a) a guide
b) policy
c) a work-in-progress
d) great
9) Who was the guide developed by?
a) students
b) mothers
c) scientists
d) expert researchers
10) What does a UK university want staff to use instead of 'breastfeeding'?
a) milkfeeding
b) lactosing
c) chestfeeding
d) bodying

Role play

Role  A – Gender-neutrality
You think gender-neutrality is the most important aspect of a language to learn. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the worst of these (and why): slang, polite language or bad language.

Role  B – Slang
You think slang is the most important aspect of a language to learn. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the worst of these (and why): gender-neutrality, polite language or bad language.

Role  C – Polite Language
You think polite language is the most important aspect of a language to learn. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the worst of these (and why): slang, gender-neutrality or bad language.

Role  D – Bad Language
You think bad language is the most important aspect of a language to learn. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their things. Also, tell the others which is the worst of these (and why): slang, polite language or gender-neutrality.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'gender'

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • and 'language'.

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • • Share your findings with your partners.

    • Make questions using the words you found.

    • Ask your partner / group your questions.

    2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

    •Share your questions with other classmates / groups. •Ask your partner / group your questions.

    3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

    4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

    5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

    • avoid
    • issued
    • part
    • instead
    • place
    • neither
    • explains
    • identify
    • added
    • just
    • assist
    • substitute




    Student survey

    Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

    (Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

    Discussion - Gender-neutral Language

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    1. What did you think when you read the headline?
    2. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'gender'?
    3. What do you know about gender-neutral language?
    4. What do you think of the English language?
    5. How does your language deal with gender?
    6. What do you think of replacing words like 'mother' and 'father'?
    7. What do you think of the term 'gestational parent'?
    8. What do you think of the term 'non-birthing parent'?
    9. What do you know about non-binary people?
    10. What three adjectives best describe this story?

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    1. Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
    2. What do you think of when you hear the word 'language'?
    3. What do you think about what you read?
    4. Should language change to make all people feel included?
    5. Should the word 'human' be changed because 'man' is in it?
    6. What do you think of titles like 'Mr," 'Miss,' 'Mrs' and 'Ms'?
    7. Should we say 'actor' and 'lion' for males and females?
    8. What advice do you have for ANU's Gender Institute?
    9. What do you think of the term 'chestfeeding' instead of 'breastfeeding'?
    10. What questions would you like to ask the university?

    Discussion — Write your own questions

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    (a) ________________

    (b) ________________

    (c) ________________

    (d) ________________

    (e) ________________

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    (f) ________________

    (g) ________________

    (h) ________________

    (i) ________________

    (j) ________________





    Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

    Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested (1) ____ avoid the use of certain words related to gender. ANU's Gender Institute issued a list (2) ____ replacement terms for everyday words like 'mother' and 'father'. The switch in vocabulary is part of an (3) ____ to encourage more gender-neutral language. Staff are being asked to use the term 'gestational parent' (4) ____ of 'mother,' and 'non-birthing parent' in place of 'father'. The institute's gender handbook claims the words 'mother' and 'father' (5) ____ non-binary people. These are people who identify as being neither male nor female. Non-binary people feel unrepresented in society because of words that (6) ____ to males and females.

    The gender handbook explains the suggested nomenclature guidelines. It says: "(7) ____ many students will identify (8) ____ 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms alone to describe parenthood excludes those who do not identify with gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is particularly important (9) ____...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was just a guide. It said: "This document is not an official ANU (10) ____....It is a guide developed by expert researchers to (11) ____ anyone committed to enhancing inclusiveness and diversity." Last week, a UK university asked its staff to (12) ____ the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.

    Which of these words go in the above text?

    1. (a)     on     (b)     to     (c)     of     (d)     at    
    2. (a)     at     (b)     of     (c)     to     (d)     on    
    3. (a)     initiation     (b)     initiate     (c)     intuitive     (d)     initiative    
    4. (a)     rather     (b)     instead     (c)     prefer     (d)     place    
    5. (a)     exude     (b)     exclude     (c)     preclude     (d)     interlude    
    6. (a)     defer     (b)     infer     (c)     refer     (d)     prefer    
    7. (a)     What     (b)     Whomsoever     (c)     While     (d)     Which    
    8. (a)     was     (b)     has     (c)     as     (d)     'twas    
    9. (a)     so     (b)     at     (c)     on     (d)     in    
    10. (a)     policy     (b)     policing     (c)     police     (d)     policed    
    11. (a)     assist     (b)     desist     (c)     resist     (d)     insist    
    12. (a)     instead     (b)     alternative     (c)     substitute     (d)     proxy

    Spelling

    Paragraph 1

    1. eudqrtees to avoid the use
    2. certain words aerdtel to gender
    3. part of an taiienvtii
    4. use the term 'tganeisoatl parent'
    5. non-nariyb people
    6. people feel eedneutrrnesp

    Paragraph 2

    1. moucenlanetr guidelines
    2. an official ANU cplyoi
    3. developed by erpext researchers
    4. to assist anyone etmciomtd
    5. enainhgnc inclusiveness
    6. tbsisutteu the word

    Put the text back together

    1  ) Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested to avoid the use
    (...)  will identify as 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms alone to describe parenthood excludes those who do not identify
    (...)  place of father . The institute's gender handbook claims the words 'mother' and 'father'
    (...)  The gender handbook explains the suggested nomenclature guidelines . It says: "While many students
    (...)  like 'mother' and 'father'. The switch in vocabulary is part of an initiative to encourage more gender-neutral
    (...)  with gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is particularly important
    (...)  by expert researchers to assist anyone committed to enhancing inclusiveness and
    (...)  exclude non-binary people. These are people who identify as being neither male nor female. Non-binary
    (...)  people feel unrepresented in society because of words that refer to males and females .
    (...)  of certain words related to gender. ANU's Gender Institute issued a list of replacement terms for everyday words
    (...)  in...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was
    (...)  language. Staff are being asked to use the term 'gestational parent' instead of mother, and 'non-birthing parent' in
    (...)  diversity." Last week, a UK university asked its staff to substitute the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.
    (...)  just a guide . It said: "This document is not an official ANU policy....It is a guide developed

    Put the words in the right order

    1. words   .   avoid   certain   the   to   of   use   Requested
    2. everyday   like   for   'mother'   .   terms   words   Replacement
    3. to   encourage   initiative   more   language   .   gender-neutral   An
    4. male   Identify   nor   female   .   being   as   neither
    5. because   society   of   feel   People   unrepresented   words   .   in
    6. will   identify   While   students   as   many   'mothers'   .
    7. identify   gender-binaries   .   who   Excludes   those   with   do   not
    8. by   researchers   .   It   is   a   developed   guide   expert
    9. anyone  to  enhancing  Assist  committed  inclusiveness  diversity  . and
    10. university   A   staff   asked   the   word   .   to   substitute

    Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

    Staff at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra have been requested / requesting to avoid the use of certain words related to / for gender. ANU's Gender Institute issued a list at / of replacement terms for everyday words like 'mother' and 'father'. The switch in vocabulary is part of an initiation / initiative to encourage more gender-neutral language. Staff are being / been asked to use the term 'gestational parent' instead of mother, and 'non-birthing parent' in / on place of father. The institute's gender handbook claiming / claims the words 'mother' and 'father' exclude non-binary people. These are people who identify / identity as being neither male nor female. Non-binary people feel unrepresented on / in society because of words that refer / defer to males and females.

    The gender handbook explains the suggestive / suggested nomenclature guidelines. It says: "While many students will identify has / as 'mothers' or 'fathers,' using these terms lonely / alone to describe parenthood exudes / excludes those who do not identify without / with gender-binaries." It added: "This non-gendered language is particular / particularly important in...discussions of childbirth and parenthood." An ANU spokesperson said the handbook was just / adjust a guide. It said: "This document is not an official ANU policy....It is a guide developed of / by expert researchers to assist anyone committed to enhancing / enhances inclusiveness and diversity." Last week, a UK university asked its staff to substitute / alternative the word 'chestfeeding' for 'breastfeeding'.

    Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

    Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

    St_ff _t th_ __str_l__n N_t__n_l _n_v_rs_ty (_N_) _n C_nb_rr_ h_v_ b__n r_q__st_d t_ _v__d th_ _s_ _f c_rt__n w_rds r_l_t_d t_ g_nd_r. _N_'s G_nd_r _nst_t_t_ _ss__d _ l_st _f r_pl_c_m_nt t_rms f_r _v_ryd_y w_rds l_k_ 'm_th_r' _nd 'f_th_r'. Th_ sw_tch _n v_c_b_l_ry _s p_rt _f _n _n_t__t_v_ t_ _nc__r_g_ m_r_ g_nd_r-n__tr_l l_ng__g_. St_ff _r_ b__ng _sk_d t_ _s_ th_ t_rm 'g_st_t__n_l p_r_nt' _nst__d _f m_th_r, _nd 'n_n-b_rth_ng p_r_nt' _n pl_c_ _f f_th_r. Th_ _nst_t_t_'s g_nd_r h_ndb__k cl__ms th_ w_rds 'm_th_r' _nd 'f_th_r' _xcl_d_ n_n-b_n_ry p__pl_. Th_s_ _r_ p__pl_ wh_ _d_nt_fy _s b__ng n__th_r m_l_ n_r f_m_l_. N_n-b_n_ry p__pl_ f__l _nr_pr_s_nt_d _n s_c__ty b_c__s_ _f w_rds th_t r_f_r t_ m_l_s _nd f_m_l_s.

    Th_ g_nd_r h_ndb__k _xpl__ns th_ s_gg_st_d n_m_ncl_t_r_ g__d_l_n_s. _t s_ys: "Wh_l_ m_ny st_d_nts w_ll _d_nt_fy _s 'm_th_rs' _r 'f_th_rs,' _s_ng th_s_ t_rms _l_n_ t_ d_scr_b_ p_r_nth__d _xcl_d_s th_s_ wh_ d_ n_t _d_nt_fy w_th g_nd_r-b_n_r__s." _t _dd_d: "Th_s n_n-g_nd_r_d l_ng__g_ _s p_rt_c_l_rly _mp_rt_nt _n...d_sc_ss__ns _f ch_ldb_rth _nd p_r_nth__d." _n _N_ sp_k_sp_rs_n s__d th_ h_ndb__k w_s j_st _ g__d_. _t s__d: "Th_s d_c_m_nt _s n_t _n _ff_c__l _N_ p_l_cy...._t _s _ g__d_ d_v_l_p_d by _xp_rt r_s__rch_rs t_ _ss_st _ny_n_ c_mm_tt_d t_ _nh_nc_ng _ncl_s_v_n_ss _nd d_v_rs_ty." L_st w__k, _ _K _n_v_rs_ty _sk_d _ts st_ff t_ s_bst_t_t_ th_ w_rd 'ch_stf__d_ng ' f_r br__stf__d_ng '.

    Punctuate the text and add capitals

    staff at the australian national university anu in canberra have been requested to avoid the use of certain words related to gender anus gender institute issued a list of replacement terms for everyday words like mother and father the switch in vocabulary is part of an initiative to encourage more genderneutral language staff are being asked to use the term gestational parent instead of mother and nonbirthing parent in place of father the institutes gender handbook claims the words mother and father exclude nonbinary people these are people who identify as being neither male nor female nonbinary people feel unrepresented in society because of words that refer to males and females

    the gender handbook explains the suggested nomenclature guidelines it says while many students will identify as mothers or fathers using these terms alone to describe parenthood excludes those who do not identify with genderbinaries it added this nongendered language is particularly important indiscussions of childbirth and parenthood an anu spokesperson said the handbook was just a guide it said this document is not an official anu policyit is a guide developed by expert researchers to assist anyone committed to enhancing inclusiveness and diversity last week a uk university asked its staff to substitute the word chestfeeding for breastfeeding

    Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

    StaffattheAustralianNationalUniversity(ANU)inCanberrahavebeenr
    equestedtoavoidtheuseofcertainwordsrelatedtogender.ANU'sGend
    erInstituteissuedalistofreplacementtermsforeverydaywordslike'mo
    ther'and'father'.Theswitchinvocabularyispartofaninitiativetoencour
    agemoregender-neutrallanguage.Staffarebeingaskedtousetheterm
    'gestationalparent'insteadof'mother,'and'non-birthingparent'inpla
    ceof'father'.Theinstitute'sgenderhandbookclaimsthewords'mother'
    and'father'excludenon-binarypeople.Thesearepeoplewhoidentify
    asbeingneithermalenorfemale.Non-binarypeoplefeelunrepresent
    edinsocietybecauseofwordsthatrefertomalesandfemales.Thegende
    rhandbookexplainsthesuggestednomenclatureguidelines.Itsays:"
    Whilemanystudentswillidentifyas'mothers'or'fathers,'usingtheseter
    msalonetodescribeparenthoodexcludesthosewhodonotidentifywith
    gender-binaries."Itadded:"Thisnon-genderedlanguageisparticul
    arlyimportantin...discussionsofchildbirthandparenthood."AnANUsp
    okespersonsaidthehandbookwasjustaguide.Itsaid:"Thisdocumentis
    notanofficialANUpolicy....Itisaguidedevelopedbyexpertresearcherst
    oassistanyonecommittedtoenhancinginclusivenessanddiversity."La
    stweek,aUKuniversityaskeditsstafftosubstitutetheword'chestfeedin
    g'for'breastfeeding'.

    Free writing

    Write about gender-neutral language for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

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    Academic writing

    All language should be gender neutral. Discuss.

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    Homework

    1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.
    2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about this news story. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.
    3. GENDER-NEUTRAL LANGUAGE: Make a poster about gender-neutral language. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?
    4. ALL GENDER NEUTRAL: Write a magazine article about all language being gender-neutral. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.
    Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).
    5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.
    6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on gender-neutral language. Ask him/her three questions about it. Give him/her three of your ideas on this. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

    Answers

    (Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

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