The Reading / Listening - Video-conferencing - Level 6

A new study from Stanford University has investigated the effects on our health of extended spells of video-conferencing. Researcher and communications expert Jeremy Bailenson dubbed the phenomenon "Zoom fatigue," but acknowledged the condition is not restricted to just that platform. In the past year, most of us have spent extended periods of time online using an array of video-conferencing platforms. The coronavirus pandemic has meant tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have been the only way we have been able to see and chat to loved ones. Many companies have relied heavily on video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.



Mr Bailenson outlined several factors that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness and eye-strain from staring at a computer screen for hours and hours. It is also brought about by "cognitive overload" and feeling pressure to be perpetually switched on. We constantly feel we need to be in touch with friends or available for bosses, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout and stress and can heighten your chance of developing moderate to severe depression. He said this anxiety can adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large number of faces staring at you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking.

Try the same news story at these easier levels:

    Video-conferencing - Level 4  or  Video-conferencing - Level 5

Sources
  • https://lifehacker.com/how-to-overcome-zoom-fatigue-1846347171
  • https://newatlas.com/telecommunications/zoom-fatigue-video-exhaustion-tips-help-stanford/
  • https://www.techradar.com/news/academics-have-identified-exactly-why-video-conferencing-has-you-feeling-exhausted


Make sure you try all of the online activities for this reading and listening - There are dictations, multiple choice, drag and drop activities, crosswords, hangman, flash cards, matching activities and a whole lot more. Please enjoy :-)



Warm-ups

1. VIDEO-CONFERENCING: Students walk around the class and talk to other students about video-conferencing. Change partners often and share your findings.
2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, talk about these topics or words from the article. What will the article say about them? What can you say about these words and your life?
       study / university / communications / expert / fatigue / platform / chat / loved ones /
       video-conferencing / eye-strain / cognitive / be in touch / depression / faces / stress
Have a chat about the topics you liked. Change topics and partners frequently.
3. FACE-TO-FACE: Students A strongly believe face-to-face is always better than video-conferencing; Students B strongly believe the opposite. Change partners again and talk about your conversations.
4. ONLINE HEALTH: How does spending time online affect our health? What solutions are there to combat this? Complete this table with your partner(s). Change partners often and share what you wrote.

 

Problems

Solutions

Anxiety

 

 

Eyes

 

 

Back

 

 

Fitness

 

 

Weight

 

 

Addiction

 

 

MY e-BOOK
ESL resource book with copiable worksheets and handouts - 1,000 Ideas and Activities for Language Teachers / English teachers
See a sample

5. VIDEO: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word "video". Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.
6. WEBSITES: Rank these with your partner. Put the best at the top. Change partners often and share your rankings.

  • Zoom
  • Skype
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Google Hangouts
  • Instagram
  • Messenger
  • YouTube

 

Vocabulary

    Paragraph 1

      1. extended a. A person who has a comprehensive and authoritative knowledge of or skill in a particular area.
      2. spell b. Limited in extent, number, scope, or action.
      3. expert c. Lasting longer than is usual or expected.
      4. dubbed d. A short period of time.
      5. phenomenon e. Gave an unofficial name or nickname to someone or something.
      6. restricted f. A remarkable person, thing, or event.
      7. array g. A range of a particular type of thing.

    Paragraph 2

      8. fatigue h. Physical or mental collapse caused by overwork or stress.
      9. cognitive i. Extreme tiredness resulting from mental or physical exertion or illness.
      10. overload j. In a way that never ends or changes; constantly.
      11. perpetually k. Average in amount, intensity, quality, or degree.
      12. burnout l. Relating to the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding.
      13. moderate m. In a way that prevents success or development; harmfully or unfavorably.
      14. adversely n. Giving too much of something, typically something undesirable, to someone

 

Before reading / listening

1. TRUE / FALSE: Read the headline. Guess if 1-8 below are true (T) or false (F).

  1. Oxford University conducted a study on video-conferencing.     T / F
  2. A researcher called tiredness while online "Zoom fatigue".     T / F
  3. The article says all of us have spent a long time online in the past year.  T / F
  4. Educators said they resent having to use video-conferencing to teach.     T / F
  5. The researcher outlined seven reasons why video-conferencing is bad.     T / F
  6. The researcher said fatigue can come because of cognitive overload.     T / F
  7. The researcher said people feel pressure to be constantly online.     T / F
  8. The researcher likened video-conferencing to speaking in public.     T / F

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article.

  1. investigated
  2. spells
  3. phenomenon
  4. array
  5. relied
  6. outlined
  7. perpetually
  8. cautioned
  9. severe
  10. staring
  1. defined
  2. happening
  3. acute
  4. always
  5. examined
  6. warned
  7. range
  8. gazing
  9. periods of time
  10. depended

3. PHRASE MATCH: (Sometimes more than one choice is possible.)

  1. extended spells
  2. dubbed the phenomenon
  3. the condition is not restricted
  4. tools
  5. relied heavily
  6. fatigue-
  7. It is also brought about by
  8. we need to be in
  9. moderate to
  10. this anxiety can adversely affect
  1. severe depression
  2. on video-conferencing
  3. inducing
  4. to just that platform
  5. your self-confidence
  6. of video-conferencing
  7. touch with friends
  8. "cognitive overload"
  9. "Zoom fatigue"
  10. like Zoom

Gap fill

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
expert
extended
way
effects
platform
heavily
fatigue
platforms

A new study from Stanford University has investigated the (1) _____________________ on our health of extended spells of video-conferencing. Researcher and communications (2) _____________________ Jeremy Bailenson dubbed the phenomenon "Zoom (3) _____________________," but acknowledged the condition is not restricted to just that (4) _____________________. In the past year, most of us have spent (5) _____________________ periods of time online using an array of video-conferencing (6) _____________________. The coronavirus pandemic has meant tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have been the only (7) _____________________ we have been able to see and chat to loved ones. Many companies have relied (8) _____________________ on video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.

Put these words into the spaces in the paragraph below.
burnout
staring
outlined
anxiety
constantly
heighten
staring
cognitive

Mr Bailenson (9) _____________________ several factors that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness and eye-strain from (10) _____________________ at a computer screen for hours and hours. It is also brought about by "(11) _____________________ overload" and feeling pressure to be perpetually switched on. We (12) _____________________ feel we need to be in touch with friends or available for bosses, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to (13) _____________________ and stress and can (14) _____________________ your chance of developing moderate to severe depression. He said this (15) _____________________ can adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large number of faces (16) _____________________ at you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking.

Listening — Guess the answers. Listen to check.

1)  A new study from Stanford University has ______
     a.  investigated the efforts
     b.  investigated the affects
     c.  investigated the effects
     d.  investigated the infects
2)  communications expert Jeremy Bailenson dubbed the phenomenon ______
     a.  Zoom fatigues
     b.  Zoom fatigue
     c.  Zoom fatigued
     d.  Zoom fat ego
3)  but acknowledged the condition is not restricted to ______
     a.  just that platform
     b.  just what platform
     c.  just at platform
     d.  just tat platform
4)  most of us have spent extended periods of time online using an ______
     a.  array of video
     b.  awry of video
     c.  alloy of video
     d.  allay of video
5)  have been the only way we have been able to see and chat ______
     a.  too loved ones
     b.  to love ones
     c.  to love once
     d.  to loved ones

6)  Mr Bailenson outlined several factors that make video-conferencing ______
     a.  so fatigue-induce in
     b.  so fatigue-induce sin
     c.  so fatigue-inducing
     d.  so fatigue-induction
7)  He said it is not just tiredness and eye-strain from staring at ______
     a.  a computer screened
     b.  a computer screens
     c.  a computer screen
     d.  a computer screening
8)  It is also brought about by "cognitive overload" ______
     a.  and feel in pressure
     b.  and feeling pleasure
     c.  end feeling pleasure
     d.  and feeling pressure
9)  heighten your chance of developing moderate ______
     a.  too sever depression
     b.  to severe depression
     c.  to sever depression
     d.  to several depression
10)  This is because of the large number of faces ______
     a.  starring at you
     b.  starling at you
     c.  staring at you
     d.  stair in at you

Listening — Listen and fill in the gaps

A new study from Stanford University has investigated (1) ____________________ our health of (2) ____________________ video-conferencing. Researcher and communications expert Jeremy Bailenson dubbed the phenomenon (3) ____________________ acknowledged the condition is not restricted to just that platform. In the past year, most of us have spent (4) ____________________ time online using an array of video-conferencing platforms. The coronavirus pandemic has meant tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have been (5) ____________________ we have been able to see and chat to loved ones. Many companies have (6) ____________________ video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.

Mr Bailenson (7) ____________________ that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness and eye-strain from staring at a computer (8) ____________________ and hours. It is also brought about by "cognitive overload" and (9) ____________________ be perpetually switched on. We constantly feel we need to be in touch with friends or (10) ____________________, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout and stress and can heighten your chance of developing (11) ____________________ depression. He said this anxiety can adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large number of (12) ____________________ you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking.

Comprehension questions

  1. At what university does the researcher who did the research work?
  2. What did the researcher dub a phenomenon?
  3. Where did the researcher say we have spent extended periods of time?
  4. Who does the article say we have chatted to using online tools?
  5. Who has relied heavily on video-conferencing?
  6. How many factors did the researcher outline?
  7. What brings about fatigue besides tiredness and eye-strain?
  8. What does the article say we are under perpetual pressure to do?
  9. What does burnout and stress heighten the chances of developing?
  10. What did the researcher liken video-conferencing to?




Multiple choice quiz

1)  At what university does the researcher who did the research work?
a) Oxford University
b) Stanford University
c) Tokyo University
d) Singapore University
2)  What did the researcher dub a phenomenon?
a) Video-fatiguing
b) Cyber-exhaustion
c) Zoom fatigue
d) Chat-nap
3)  Where did the researcher say we have spent extended periods of time?
a) in our living rooms
b) in lockdown
c) on holiday
d) online
4)  Who does the article say we have chatted to using online tools?
a) penfriends
b) loved ones
c) children
d) grandparents
5)  Who has relied heavily on video-conferencing?
a) companies
b) Zoom
c) politicians
d) journalists

6)  How many factors did the researcher outline?
a) several
b) seven
c) seventy
d) seventeen
7)  What brings about fatigue besides tiredness and eye-strain?
a) intelligence
b) depression
c) shopping addiction
d) cognitive overload
8)  What does the article say we are under perpetual pressure to do?
a) research
b) write emails
c) switched on
d) watch videos
9)  What does burnout and stress heighten the chances of developing?
a) a bad back
b) headaches
c) Internet addictions
d) moderate to severe depression
10)  What did the researcher liken video-conferencing to?
a) movie making
b) public speaking
c) karaoke
d) science fiction

Role play

Role  A – Zoom
You think Zoom is the best website. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their websites. Also, tell the others which is the least useful of these (and why): Skype, YouTube or Twitter.

Role  B – Skype
You think Skype is the best website. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their websites. Also, tell the others which is the least useful of these (and why): Zoom, YouTube or Twitter.

Role  C – YouTube
You think YouTube is the best website. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their websites. Also, tell the others which is the least useful of these (and why): Skype, Zoom or Twitter.

Role  D – Twitter
You think Twitter is the best website. Tell the others three reasons why. Tell them what is wrong with their websites. Also, tell the others which is the least useful of these (and why): Skype, YouTube or Zoom.

After reading / listening

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionary / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words...

'video'

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • and 'fatigue'.

  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • ________________
  • • Share your findings with your partners.

    • Make questions using the words you found.

    • Ask your partner / group your questions.

    2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

    •Share your questions with other classmates / groups. •Ask your partner / group your questions.

    3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

    4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

    5. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall how they were used in the text:

    • new
    • dubbed
    • past
    • array
    • tools
    • heavily
    • inducing
    • screen
    • pressure
    • touch
    • severe
    • public




    Student survey

    Write five GOOD questions about this topic in the table. Do this in pairs. Each student must write the questions on his / her own paper. When you have finished, interview other students. Write down their answers.

    (Please look at page 12 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

    Discussion - Video-conferencing

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    1. What did you think when you read the headline?
    2. What images are in your mind when you hear the word 'video'?
    3. What do you think of video-conferencing?
    4. How do you think video-conferencing affects our health?
    5. How much video-conferencing have you done in the past year?
    6. What are the best video-conferencing platforms?
    7. What do you think of 'Zoom fatigue'?
    8. What do you think of school lessons being online?
    9. What would the pandemic be like without video-conferencing?
    10. What would companies do without video-conferencing?

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    1. Did you like reading this article? Why/not?
    2. What do you think of when you hear the word 'fatigue'?
    3. What do you think about what you read?
    4. What do you do about eye-strain?
    5. What do you know about 'cognitive overload'?
    6. Do you feel you always have to be online?
    7. How could being online make you depressed?
    8. What video-conferencing calls have you made recently?
    9. What do you think of public speaking?
    10. What questions would you like to ask the researcher?

    Discussion — Write your own questions

    STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

    (a) ________________

    (b) ________________

    (c) ________________

    (d) ________________

    (e) ________________

    STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

    (f) ________________

    (g) ________________

    (h) ________________

    (i) ________________

    (j) ________________





    Language — Cloze (Gap-fill)

    A new study from Stanford University has investigated the (1) ____ on our health of extended spells of video-conferencing. Researcher and communications expert Jeremy Bailenson (2) ____ the phenomenon "Zoom fatigue," but acknowledged the condition is not (3) ____ to just that platform. In the past year, most of us have spent extended periods of time online using an array of video-conferencing platforms. The coronavirus pandemic has (4) ____ tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have been the only way we have been able to see and chat to (5) ____ ones. Many companies have relied heavily (6) ____ video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.

    Mr Bailenson (7) ____ several factors that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness and eye-(8) ____ from staring at a computer screen for hours and hours. It is also brought about by "cognitive overload" and feeling pressure to be (9) ____ switched on. We constantly feel we need to be in touch with friends or available for bosses, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout and stress and can (10) ____ your chance of developing moderate to (11) ____ depression. He said this anxiety can adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large number of faces (12) ____ at you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking.

    Which of these words go in the above text?

    1. (a)     infects     (b)     affects     (c)     effects     (d)     reflects    
    2. (a)     dubbed     (b)     daubed     (c)     dabbled     (d)     dibbed    
    3. (a)     restricted     (b)     restriction     (c)     restricts     (d)     restrict    
    4. (a)     meant     (b)     mean     (c)     meaning     (d)     means    
    5. (a)     loves     (b)     loved     (c)     loving     (d)     lover    
    6. (a)     in     (b)     at     (c)     to     (d)     on    
    7. (a)     in-lined     (b)     aligned     (c)     outlined     (d)     lined    
    8. (a)     stem     (b)     stain     (c)     steam     (d)     strain    
    9. (a)     perpetually     (b)     perpetual     (c)     perpetrate     (d)     perpetuity    
    10. (a)     higher     (b)     heighten     (c)     heathen     (d)     heather    
    11. (a)     severs     (b)     severe     (c)     sever     (d)     several    
    12. (a)     starring     (b)     starry     (c)     staring     (d)     storing

    Spelling

    Paragraph 1

    1. tmsncoioncaumi expert
    2. not csitdertre to just that platform
    3. neeedxtd periods of time
    4. an rayra of video-conferencing
    5. ielred heavily on video-conferencing
    6. ueroascdt have used them

    Paragraph 2

    1. aftgieu-inducing
    2. brought about by noigevtci overload
    3. be uplepretlya switched on
    4. developing edaotemr to severe depression
    5. this aeitnxy
    6. erlvsyaed affect your self-confidence

    Put the text back together

    (...)  and stress and can heighten your chance of developing moderate to
    (...)  spells of video-conferencing. Researcher and communications expert Jeremy Bailenson
    (...)  strain from staring at a computer screen for hours and hours. It is also brought about by "cognitive
    (...)  overload" and feeling pressure to be perpetually switched on. We constantly feel we need to be in touch
    (...)  number of faces staring at you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking.
    (...)  of video-conferencing platforms. The coronavirus pandemic has meant tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have
    (...)  that platform. In the past year, most of us have spent extended periods of time online using an array
    (...)  been the only way we have been able to see and chat to loved ones. Many companies have relied
    (...)  Mr Bailenson outlined several factors that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness and eye-
    (...)  with friends or available for bosses, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout
    (...)  severe depression. He said this anxiety can adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large
    1  ) A new study from Stanford University has investigated the effects on our health of extended
    (...)  heavily on video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.
    (...)  dubbed the phenomenon "Zoom fatigue," but acknowledged the condition is not restricted to just

    Put the words in the right order

    1. our   extended   effects   The   health   of   on   spells   .
    2. restricted   to   platform   .   condition   isn't   that   just   The
    3. of   Most   periods   us   spent   time   .   extended   of
    4. companies   have   relied   video-conferencing   .   Many   on   heavily
    5. teach   their   them   lessons   .   to   have   Educators   used
    6. fatigue-inducing  .  Several  factors  video-conferencing  that  make   so
    7. by   cognitive   also   It   is   brought   about   overload   .
    8. in   We   touch   .   we   constantly   must   be   feel
    9. at   staring   The   you   .   faces   number   of   large
    10. this   public   likens   speaking   .   stresses   to   of   Bailenson

    Circle the correct word (20 pairs)

    A new / newly study from Stanford University has investigated the effects on our health of extended spells of video-conferencing. Researcher and communications expert / expat Jeremy Bailenson dubbed / daubed the phenomenon "Zoom fatigue," but acknowledged the conditional / condition is not restricted to just that platform. In the past year, most of them / us have spent extended periods of time online using an alloy / array of video-conferencing platforms. The coronavirus pandemic has meaning / meant tools like Zoom, FaceTime, Skype and Google Hangouts have been the only way we have been able to see and chat to loves / loved ones. Many companies have relied heavily / heavy on video-conferencing for meetings, and educators have used them to teach their lessons online.

    Mr Bailenson outlined several factories / factors that make video-conferencing so fatigue-inducing. He said it is not just tiredness / tiring and eye-strain from staring / starring at a computer screen for hours and hours. It is also brought about by "cognitive overload" and feels / feeling pressure to be perpetually switched off / on. We constantly feel we need to be in touch / feel with friends or available for bosses, customers or students. Bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout and stress and can higher / heighten your chance of developing moderate to severe depression. He said this anxiety can adverse / adversely affect your self-confidence. This is because of the large / largely number of faces staring at you in meetings. Bailenson likens this to the stresses of private / public speaking.

    Talk about the connection between each pair of words in italics, and why the correct word is correct.

    Insert the vowels (a, e, i, o, u)

    _  n_w  st_dy  fr_m  St_nf_rd  _n_v_rs_ty  h_s  _nv_st_g_t_d  th_  _ff_cts  _n  __r  h__lth  _f  _xt_nd_d  sp_lls  _f  v_d__-c_nf_r_nc_ng.  R_s__rch_r  _nd  c_mm_n_c_t__ns  _xp_rt  J_r_my  B__l_ns_n  d_bb_d  th_  ph_n_m_n_n  "Z__m  f_t_g__,"  b_t  _ckn_wl_dg_d  th_  c_nd_t__n  _s  n_t  r_str_ct_d  t_  j_st  th_t  pl_tf_rm.  _n  th_  p_st  y__r,  m_st  _f  _s  h_v_  sp_nt  _xt_nd_d  p_r__ds  _f  t_m_  _nl_n_  _s_ng  _n  _rr_y  _f  v_d__-c_nf_r_nc_ng  pl_tf_rms.  Th_  c_r_n_v_r_s  p_nd_m_c  h_s  m__nt  t__ls  l_k_  Z__m,  F_c_T_m_,  Skyp_  _nd  G__gl_  H_ng__ts  h_v_  b__n  th_  _nly  w_y  w_  h_v_  b__n  _bl_  t_  s__  _nd  ch_t  t_  l_v_d  _n_s.  M_ny  c_mp_n__s  h_v_  r_l__d  h__v_ly  _n  v_d__-c_nf_r_nc_ng  f_r  m__t_ngs,  _nd  _d_c_t_rs  h_v_  _s_d  th_m  t_  t__ch  th__r  l_ss_ns  _nl_n_.

    Mr  B__l_ns_n  __tl_n_d  s_v_r_l  f_ct_rs  th_t  m_k_  v_d__-c_nf_r_nc_ng  s_  f_t_g__-_nd_c_ng.  H_  s__d  _t  _s  n_t  j_st  t_r_dn_ss  _nd  _y_-str__n  fr_m  st_r_ng  _t  _  c_mp_t_r  scr__n  f_r  h__rs  _nd  h__rs.  _t  _s  _ls_  br__ght  _b__t  by  "c_gn_t_v_  _v_rl__d"  _nd  f__l_ng  pr_ss_r_  t_  b_  p_rp_t__lly  sw_tch_d  _n.  W_  c_nst_ntly  f__l  w_  n__d  t_  b_  _n  t__ch  w_th  fr__nds  _r  _v__l_bl_  f_r  b_ss_s,  c_st_m_rs  _r  st_d_nts.  B__l_ns_n  c__t__n_d  th_s  l__ds  t_  b_rn__t  _nd  str_ss  _nd  c_n  h__ght_n  y__r  ch_nc_  _f  d_v_l_p_ng  m_d_r_t_  t_  s_v_r_  d_pr_ss__n.  H_  s__d  th_s  _nx__ty  c_n  _dv_rs_ly  _ff_ct  y__r  s_lf-c_nf_d_nc_.  Th_s  _s  b_c__s_  _f  th_  l_rg_  n_mb_r  _f  f_c_s  st_r_ng  _t  y__  _n  m__t_ngs.  B__l_ns_n  l_k_ns  th_s  t_  th_  str_ss_s  _f  p_bl_c  sp__k_ng.

    Punctuate the text and add capitals

    a new study from stanford university has investigated the effects on our health of extended spells of videoconferencing researcher and communications expert jeremy bailenson dubbed the phenomenon zoom fatigue but acknowledged the condition is not restricted to just that platform in the past year most of us have spent extended periods of time online using an array of videoconferencing platforms the coronavirus pandemic has meant tools like zoom facetime skype and google hangouts have been the only way we have been able to see and chat to loved ones many companies have relied heavily on videoconferencing for meetings and educators have used them to teach their lessons online

    mr bailenson outlined several factors that make videoconferencing so fatigueinducing he said it is not just tiredness and eyestrain from staring at a computer screen for hours and hours it is also brought about by cognitive overload and feeling pressure to be perpetually switched on we constantly feel we need to be in touch with friends or available for bosses customers or students bailenson cautioned this leads to burnout and stress and can heighten your chance of developing moderate to severe depression he said this anxiety can adversely affect your selfconfidence this is because of the large number of faces staring at you in meetings bailenson likens this to the stresses of public speaking

    Put a slash (/) where the spaces are

    AnewstudyfromStanfordUniversityhasinvestigatedtheeffectsonour
    healthofextendedspellsofvideo-conferencing.Researcherandcomm
    unicationsexpertJeremyBailensondubbedthephenomenon"Zoomfat
    igue,"butacknowledgedtheconditionisnotrestrictedtojustthatplatfor
    m.Inthepastyear,mostofushavespentextendedperiodsoftimeonline
    usinganarrayofvideo-conferencingplatforms.Thecoronaviruspand
    emichasmeanttoolslikeZoom,FaceTime,SkypeandGoogleHangouts
    havebeentheonlywaywehavebeenabletoseeandchattolovedones.M
    anycompanieshavereliedheavilyonvideo-conferencingformeetings,
    andeducatorshaveusedthemtoteachtheirlessonsonline.MrBailenson
    outlinedseveralfactorsthatmakevideo-conferencingsofatigue-indu
    cing.Hesaiditisnotjusttirednessandeye-strainfromstaringatacomp
    uterscreenforhoursandhours.Itisalsobroughtaboutby"cognitiveover
    load"andfeelingpressuretobeperpetuallyswitchedon.Weconstantlyf
    eelweneedtobeintouchwithfriendsoravailableforbosses,customerso
    rstudents.Bailensoncautionedthisleadstoburnoutandstressandcanh
    eightenyourchanceofdevelopingmoderatetoseveredepression.Hesa
    idthisanxietycanadverselyaffectyourself-confidence.Thisisbecau
    seofthelargenumberoffacesstaringatyouinmeetings.Bailensonliken
    sthistothestressesofpublicspeaking.

    Free writing

    Write about video-conferencing for 10 minutes. Comment on your partner’s paper.

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    Academic writing

    Video-conferencing is better than face-to-face. Discuss.

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    Homework

    1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google's search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.
    2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find out more about this news story. Share what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.
    3. VIDEO-CONFERENCING: Make a poster about video-conferencing. Show your work to your classmates in the next lesson. Did you all have similar things?
    4. ONLINE TRAINING: Write a magazine article about schools providing for students to effectively use video-conferencing. Include imaginary interviews with people who are for and against this.
    Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Write down any new words and expressions you hear from your partner(s).
    5. WHAT HAPPENED NEXT? Write a newspaper article about the next stage in this news story. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Give each other feedback on your articles.
    6. LETTER: Write a letter to an expert on video-conferencing. Ask him/her three questions about it. Give him/her three of your opinions on it. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

    Answers

    (Please look at page 26 of the PDF to see a photocopiable example of this activity.)

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